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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been reloading various rifle and pistol cartridges for over 40 years. Lots of experience and a lot of reloading equipment on hand. All I need are dies. For my bolt action rifles I've always used the competition grade dies; those with a sliding sleeve for bullet seating. Not sure I need that kind of precision for hunting wild boar at 200 yds and closer. What does the 68 community recommend?
 

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I personally use the Hornady with the "sliding sleeve" just because. They come standard in the Hornady line as far as I know as I have them in .223/5.56 and 6.8.
 

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I've been loading the same amount of time as you lol I've got four different brands of dies in my cabinet and I am using Lee dies with no problems for the 6.8.
 

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I have RCBS small base and the Hornady dies, but the Hornady gets used the most often. I bought the RCBS to use on my Dillon 550, but with most loads having the powder near the case mouth it makes progressive press reloading more difficult.
 

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dies

i have lee and hornady dies for my 6.8. Both work very well but lately i've used the Hornady. i like the features it has such as the sliding sleeve on the seating die.
 

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I like the Hornady seating die with the sleeve as well but I have had zero problems with Lee, RCBS, Forster or Redding Type S dies. It all depends on what you like the best.
 

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Since I shoot hogs in the neck, I want accuracy at 200 yards with my hunting rifle. If you are used to using competition dies I would suggest the Redding S-Type Bushing dies with Competition Seater. I've been bitten too many times by concentricity issues so started my 6.8mm with this bushing dies. I also started with the Hornady micro adjust seating die but then found a Redding Comp Seater on sale. Nothing wrong with the Hornady micro adjust but it sits idle now.
 

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I use the Hornady dies with the micro adjust stem.
On loads I am looking for maximum accuracy especially with projectiles in excess of 1in length I turn the cartridge during seating.
Seat 1/4 depth, turn 1/2 turn. Seat another 1/4 depth, turn 1/4 turn. Seat another 1/4 depth, turn 1/2 turn. Seat fully.
Not positive who told me to try this, perhaps Xman. It does improve contricity when using non competition seating dies.
I also have Lee 6.8 dies and see a difference with them as well.
 

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I use the Hornady dies with the micro adjust stem.
On loads I am looking for maximum accuracy especially with projectiles in excess of 1in length I turn the cartridge during seating.
Seat 1/4 depth, turn 1/2 turn. Seat another 1/4 depth, turn 1/4 turn. Seat another 1/4 depth, turn 1/2 turn. Seat fully.
Not positive who told me to try this, perhaps Xman. It does improve contricity when using non competition seating dies.
I also have Lee 6.8 dies and see a difference with them as well.
What difference do you see with Lee dies? Concentricity? Case dimensions? Please explain.
 

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What difference do you see with Lee dies? Concentricity? Case dimensions? Please explain.
I size cases with one stroke of the press as usual.
I'm talking about seating the projectile, so this only pertains to the seating die.
Yes, concentricity is better.
 

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I size cases with one stroke of the press as usual.
I'm talking about seating the projectile, so this only pertains to the seating die.
Yes, concentricity is better.
I remember reading years ago about seating like this. It's supposedly an old benchrest trick. I've done it for years. Only I just seat halfway then spin 180 degrees then seat the rest of the way. Not sure if it makes any difference at all. But pretty much all my rifle rounds get the bullet seated that way.
 

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It's supposedly an old benchrest trick. I've done it for years. Only I just seat halfway then spin 180 degrees then seat the rest of the way. Not sure if it makes any difference at all.
I had a mate from New Zealand suggest this technique to me. One day, I seated 10 rounds using a single stroke without spinning the case then 10 using the method of seating halfway then spin 180 degrees then seating the rest of the way. The concentricity of the latter group (halfway-spin) was improved by a factor of two.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank for all the responses.

This is my first foray into semi-auto rifle reloading. Have always reloaded for bolt guns.

Do I need the small base resizing dies or will the regular full length resizing dies be ok? I only have one 6.8 gun so reloading for several chanbers isn't in the equation.
 

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Thank for all the responses.

This is my first foray into semi-auto rifle reloading. Have always reloaded for bolt guns.

Do I need the small base resizing dies or will the regular full length resizing dies be ok? I only have one 6.8 gun so reloading for several chanbers isn't in the equation.
Standard full length dies will work, those are the only type I use for autoloading rifles and not one problem.
 

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Do I need the small base resizing dies or will the regular full length resizing dies be ok? I only have one 6.8 gun so reloading for several chanbers isn't in the equation.
I've had 7 different 6.8mm chambers and a standard full-length resizing die has done fine in all of them.
 

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I had a mate from New Zealand suggest this technique to me. One day, I seated 10 rounds using a single stroke without spinning the case then 10 using the method of seating halfway then spin 180 degrees then seating the rest of the way. The concentricity of the latter group (halfway-spin) was improved by a factor of two.
I've done this for years just because I thought it might help. Nice to know someone actually tested the theory.
 

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I use the Hornady dies with the micro adjust stem.
On loads I am looking for maximum accuracy especially with projectiles in excess of 1in length I turn the cartridge during seating.
Seat 1/4 depth, turn 1/2 turn. Seat another 1/4 depth, turn 1/4 turn. Seat another 1/4 depth, turn 1/2 turn. Seat fully.
Not positive who told me to try this, perhaps Xman. It does improve contricity when using non competition seating dies.
I also have Lee 6.8 dies and see a difference with them as well.
I was taught to do this by my father in my early teens and have been seating rifle bullets this way since.

When I get a round tuit I plan on actually checking to see if it improves concentricity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Redding Type S Match dies have arrived. Wasn't reading the fine print and now realize I need neck-sizing bushings for the sizing die.

Based on reading the forums here, I picked up one lb each of H322, Reloader 7, Reloader 10, and A2200, and some TSX and TTSX bullets in the 95-110 gr. range.

I have about 100 fired Federal brass (American Eagle brand). I plan to de-burr the primer sprue holes, and toss them into the tumbler for cleaning. Will start some loading and testing once I get the right neck-sizing die bushings.

What size(s) brushing(s) should I add to my kit to finish the process of assembling the right tools?
 
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