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I got guns, you got guns, we all got guns! Free to the bone, please do not f**k with me.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

I'm getting one... That dude with the mustache is my new hero.
 

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I got guns, you got guns, we all got guns! Free to the bone, please do not f**k with me.
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·

This one's even better, but my hero isn't in it... He must have got a new job battling evil somewhere.
 

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That is pretty awesome. I don't have any battle ready swords yet just some replica style ones. I could put an edge on them but two of them are very heavy almost Conan style great swords. I so want to get a traditionally folded steel Katana but those run about 2K for a real one.
 

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I bought a few Cold Steel knives a number of years ago. I bought a Trail Master knife. It was a factory second. Minor grinding off set on the top blade point. Got it for $99.00
I had the brass guard and butt removed as well as the rubber handle. Replaced the Butt and hand guard in nickle. Replaced the grip with Oosic. Cost me another $100.00. It aint new anymore but still a great tool.

http://s893.photobucket.com/user/hyrdr/slideshow/Blade

 

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I bought a few Cold Steel knives a number of years ago. I bought a Trail Master knife. It was a factory second. Minor grinding off set on the top blade point. Got it for $99.00
I had the brass guard and butt removed as well as the rubber handle. Replaced the Butt and hand guard in nickle. Replaced the grip with Oosic. Cost me another $100.00. It aint new anymore but still a great tool.

http://s893.photobucket.com/user/hyrdr/slideshow/Blade

Just as with the Blarney Stone... the Oosik must be kissed for good luck. :a31:
 

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I got guns, you got guns, we all got guns! Free to the bone, please do not f**k with me.
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

Yes!!
 

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Gonna fast-carve the next T-Day turkey? Those'll get-er-done fer yaz.
 

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Good looking sword. Always been a fan of good blades. I've got a katana my dad brought back from Japan after the war that was in military guise. When he passed and the sword came to me, I wanted to find out if it was a real antique, so I sent it to the only guy outside of Japan who is certified to restore Japanese swords by the body in Japan that regulates that sort of thing.

After a bunch of work getting it stripped down, we found out it wasn't an old heirloom commandeered by the military, but it was a civilian blade made in 1926. Still excellent quality however. Fred restored it to its full glory, to the point that it is worth about $5,000 today. It is a beautiful example of the sword maker's art, and I'm sure my dad would be as proud of it as I am. If anybody wants to see it, I'll post some pictures but I didn't want to hijack the OPs thread.
 

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I got guns, you got guns, we all got guns! Free to the bone, please do not f**k with me.
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
. If anybody wants to see it, I'll post some pictures but I didn't want to hijack the OPs thread.
I don't care... make this the sword thread.

 

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Ratdog you DO know what it is right?? Sorry, aint kissing it. Got a rule bout that. :a20:
Of course I do... that's why I said it. LOL
 

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Sorry this took so long. My camera isn't working right, so I had to track down some old pics and get them transferred to this PC. Anyway, here they are.


If you look close you can see the tempering marks just above the razor sharp edge. A true katana will have this tempering pattern.


The scabbard is made of a special traditional wood (two halves) that prevents damage to the blade and its edge. The furniture is silver on sword and scabbard, and in the traditional format. The motil used is also very traditional in the Crossed Falcon Feather pattern.


The hilt is made of a two piece traditional wood, wrapped in ray skin, held in place by two pins. The wrapping is the traditional pattern and type of cloth, with a silver pommel cap.

The edge is sharpened by hand by specially trained sword makers, and polished with a special rice paper. The katana, overall, is the highest evolution of the sword maker's art. While this one is not an heirloom blade, it still adheres to the finest traditions of the master sword makers practicing their art for the last 1000 years.
 

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Whenever I see one of these Japanese style swords I think about my middle school friend Tim

Tim was the only one who did not laugh when I dropped a perti dish. The bottom fell off, glass and bread mold everywhere. He helped me clean it up. Needless to say we became good friends playing with army men in the bushes and dirt bombing each others army.
This was my first exposure to reloading. His father reloaded shotgun. I was already playing with gun powder from caps and firecrackers but this stuff looked different. So I took a bit and tried to set it off and was unable too. Learned a lot. Ok the swords.
His father was a Judge who had spent time in Korea during and after the war. He adopted Tim. Yes he is 100% Korean. We had a lot of fun and turns out his Dad and my Uncle were best friends and Hunting buddies from Church. Small world. Ok The swords
Took my first drink of beer with Tim. Another close friends dad had a Keg. We were sucking on the thing and got looped, tried to play basketball but got too dizzy. Ok The swords
Next day we were playing in a old 1959 Caddilac in the drive wy and went from there into the basement. He takes me back into a corner closet and brings out two of these Samari Swords his Dad had brought back to the states. Here is where it gets scary.
He unsheaths one and hands it to me. Pulls out the second one and syas Lets swordfight!!!:a30: He lets out a scream and raises it over his head and starts to come down on me. I yelled HAY NO QUIT! He starts laughing cause I just peed my pants. I will never forget that slant eyed box headed boy screaming with the sword.

A couple 5/6 years ago I looked him up. He is a successful criminal lawyer. I asked about the swords and he laughed and said yea I remember that. I asked if he still had them and he does. He even took them down and had them authenticated. These was Japanese scrolling under the handles. I forget what he said it said but they are still in his possession.
Some things I remember about them is the one he handed to me was rather plane handled compared to the one he had and how incredibly light they were.
We did lightly swing em back and forth but both knew enough to be careful. Only had it in my hand for 5 minutes and suggested we put them back Too cool. I think I'm gonna look him up again.
 

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Yeah, the tang is where the sword maker stamped the kanji characters that indicated where and when the blade was forged, and who the sword smith who made it was. The heirloom grade blades also often listed the owner and his family. Some of those swords are considered to be as valuable as the crown jewels of England, etc. Japan has quietly been trying for decades to track down as many of them as possible that ended up as war souvenirs.

Mine was made in 1926, but beyond that is not special in any way. At the start of the war, the gov't asked citizens to donate their blades because there was a shortage of them for officers and non-coms. Those that were donated were refinished in olive drab military dress, and scabbards were made from metal to better withstand combat use. That's how my dad's was when he brought it home. At some point in the mid-50's the hilt started to come loose, so he epoxied the damn thing on to the tang. It hung on the wall for the next 60 years. When I decided to find out if it was worth anything as an heirloom, it took over a month to find a solvent that would break down the epoxy without damaging the blade. The military hilt was trashed in that process. So, I decided to have it restored. As you can see from the pictures, Fred Lohman did a superb job. He's located in Oregon, and is the only certified katana sword master outside of Japan. He's the guy to contact to repair/restore these swords. I'm sure my dad would have been proud to see how his turned out, just as I am. His division was slated to be the first to hit the beach when we invaded the home islands, so he would've been facing one of those swords in the hands of the enemy. Luckily for him, and the rest of the potential million casualties that were expected, Japan surrendered after Nagasaki. So, he got to spend 13 months on occupation duty instead.

To me, this sword represents the sacrifices he and all the thousands of other GIs made in winning WWII, both in Europe and the Pacific. He served in both theaters.
 

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Yeah, the tang is where the sword maker stamped the kanji characters that indicated where and when the blade was forged, and who the sword smith who made it was. The heirloom grade blades also often listed the owner and his family. Some of those swords are considered to be as valuable as the crown jewels of England, etc. Japan has quietly been trying for decades to track down as many of them as possible that ended up as war souvenirs.

Mine was made in 1926, but beyond that is not special in any way. At the start of the war, the gov't asked citizens to donate their blades because there was a shortage of them for officers and non-coms. Those that were donated were refinished in olive drab military dress, and scabbards were made from metal to better withstand combat use. That's how my dad's was when he brought it home. At some point in the mid-50's the hilt started to come loose, so he epoxied the damn thing on to the tang. It hung on the wall for the next 60 years. When I decided to find out if it was worth anything as an heirloom, it took over a month to find a solvent that would break down the epoxy with damaging the blade. The military hilt was trashed in that process. So, I decided to have it restored. As you can see from the pictures, Fred Lohman did a superb job. He's located in Oregon, and is the only certified katana sword master outside of Japan. He's the guy to contact to repair/restore these swords. I'm sure my dad would have been proud to see how his turned out, just as I am. His division was slated to be the first to hit the beach when we invaded the home islands, so he would've been facing one of those swords in the hands of the enemy. Luckily for him, and the rest of the potential million casualties that were expected, Japan surrendered after Nagasaki. So, he got to spend 13 months on occupation duty instead.

To me, this sword represents the sacrifices he and all the thousands of other GIs made in winning WWII, both in Europe and the Pacific. He served in both theaters.
It's beautiful. The lace work is interesting. How much does it weigh without the scabbard???
 
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