6.8 SPC Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,342 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
today whilst trimming some plastic off a pistol grip my box knife skipped and sliced my left index finger. nothing major, it was like slow motion viewing and i kinda pulled the punch. anyway, bleeding, washed it, poured hydrogen peroxide over it, pressure until the bleeding slowed, super glued that sucker and it's good to go. just what super glue was invented to do, have to leave left handed butt scratching and nose picking out of the rotation for a few days tho
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
today whilst trimming some plastic off a pistol grip my box knife skipped and sliced my left index finger. nothing major, it was like slow motion viewing and i kinda pulled the punch. anyway, bleeding, washed it, poured hydrogen peroxide over it, pressure until the bleeding slowed, super glued that sucker and it's good to go. just what super glue was invented to do, have to leave left handed butt scratching and nose picking out of the rotation for a few days tho
Yes, and it's great for cracked cuticles, fingertips, and knuckles during wintertime hunting season too. Much better than a bandaid.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
22,080 Posts
Butt scratching should most definitely come AFTER the nose picking though. :a05:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,932 Posts
Knew a guy that worked for the grounds dept of a school district and he carried a tube of super glue with him at work every day as he was constantly getting cuts. Said it saved a lot of time hunting for band-aids and worked better.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,342 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Butt scratching should most definitely come AFTER the nose picking though. :a05:
LOL as soon as i posted that i knew i had the order incorrect
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,323 Posts
I have a friend that is a surgeon and he stitched me up on one hunt on a remote island, he said if didn't have his kit with him, he would have super glued it. I always have a tube in my first aid kit and swap it out regular as it will harden in the tube. I used to work in a place where we bought it in FIVE GALLON containers. One guy got accidentally sprayed in the face, that was a scary event, it glued his eyes and nose shut(he was supposed to be wearing a face shield). A few days in the hospital and he was a good as new, no permanent damage.
A buddy of mine shot a male vervet monkey in Africa, he had a tube of superglue in his kit and and glued the monkeys "hand" to his external "plumbing", he has a photo of two of the native staff, with huge grins, try to get the dead monkey to let go of his junk!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,227 Posts
There is a reason for dermabond. About 10% of the population could go into toxic shock from the ingredients of regular everyday superglue.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,342 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
There is a reason for dermabond. About 10% of the population could go into toxic shock from the ingredients of regular everyday superglue.
after reading the africa story i wish it were much higher than 10%, is it any wonder where the anti gun and anti hunting crowd get their ammunition? LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,323 Posts
There is a reason for dermabond. About 10% of the population could go into toxic shock from the ingredients of regular everyday superglue.
I actually did quite a bit of research on it at one time, when we were using gallons of it and never found that information, the Medical version, OCTYL cyanoacrylate is only slightly different and was created, because it is less irritating to the skin. Regular old cyanoacrylate glue is said to be safer than conventional sutures, with less infection, faster healing and less scarring. I know of a several of surgeons recommending it without any warnings. Toxicity warnings I have not found anywhere.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,429 Posts
Biggest thing anyone can do is clean/scrub your wound as soon as possible (good job OP!): 10min under running tap water is ideal. If you're in the field do the best job you can with as much of your available water as you can spare, especially if it will be a while before care. Closing a dirty wound can be a bad deal.

sutures, staples, dermabond, superglue, duct tape, dental floss... BTDT:cool:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,227 Posts
I actually did quite a bit of research on it at one time, when we were using gallons of it and never found that information, the Medical version, OCTYL cyanoacrylate is only slightly different and was created, because it is less irritating to the skin. Regular old cyanoacrylate glue is said to be safer than conventional sutures, with less infection, faster healing and less scarring. I know of a several of surgeons recommending it without any warnings. Toxicity warnings I have not found anywhere.
During the Vietnam war it was used in field surgery with good effect, however, despite the promising results it was not approved by the Unites States Food and Drug Administration due to the unknown toxicity and two significant side effects during the polymerization process:

  1. The curing process creates an exothermic reaction (heat) which can cause further tissue damage.
  2. The process releases cyanoacetate and formaldehyde - both irritants to the eyes, nose, throat and lungs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,932 Posts
During the Vietnam war it was used in field surgery with good effect, however, despite the promising results it was not approved by the Unites States Food and Drug Administration due to the unknown toxicity and two significant side effects during the polymerization process:

  1. The curing process creates an exothermic reaction (heat) which can cause further tissue damage.
  2. The process releases cyanoacetate and formaldehyde - both irritants to the eyes, nose, throat and lungs.
And at least some of the blood clotting agents that have recently hit the scene for traumatic injuries have also been shown to create an exothermic reaction also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,323 Posts
During the Vietnam war it was used in field surgery with good effect, however, despite the promising results it was not approved by the Unites States Food and Drug Administration due to the unknown toxicity and two significant side effects during the polymerization process:

  1. The curing process creates an exothermic reaction (heat) which can cause further tissue damage.
  2. The process releases cyanoacetate and formaldehyde - both irritants to the eyes, nose, throat and lungs.
I have worked a lot in the pharmaceutical business and as far as warnings go, those are less than nearly anything you can buy, prescription or non. There is a big difference between "unknown toxicity" and being toxic to 10% of the population. No doubt items 1 and 2 are absolutely correct, but unless you are using huge amounts, #1 is a non-issue, #2 is true and I wouldn't use it on the face for that reason, but again, unless you are using huge amounts elsewhere it isn't an issue.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,227 Posts
I have worked a lot in the pharmaceutical business and as far as warnings go, those are less than nearly anything you can buy, prescription or non. There is a big difference between "unknown toxicity" and being toxic to 10% of the population. No doubt items 1 and 2 are absolutely correct, but unless you are using huge amounts, #1 is a non-issue, #2 is true and I wouldn't use it on the face for that reason, but again, unless you are using huge amounts elsewhere it isn't an issue.
You know what they say, most statistics are made up on the spot. :a26: I read it somewhere months ago when I was setting up a trauma kit but can't seem to find it now. I was just passing along information so people could make their own decisions. I would use it on myself without hesitation but not so sure if I would use it on a stranger.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top