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Could use some guidance. I have only used a standard buffers on my builds so far. But I am planning an SBR suppressed and I need a H2 buffer. Any suggestions on a good buffer at a reasonable price. I have seen them vary from $20 on up not sure what makes them vary so much.
 

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I've used several H2's from PSA, and I've been happy with them. They are now on sale now for $19.99
 

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Could use some guidance. I have only used a standard buffers on my builds so far. But I am planning an SBR suppressed and I need a H2 buffer. Any suggestions on a good buffer at a reasonable price. I have seen them vary from $20 on up not sure what makes them vary so much.
The name painted on them is the big difference. Otherwise they are pretty much all the same.
 

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Could use some guidance. I have only used a standard buffers on my builds so far. But I am planning an SBR suppressed and I need a H2 buffer. Any suggestions on a good buffer at a reasonable price. I have seen them vary from $20 on up not sure what makes them vary so much.
I just have to ask how you know you need an H2? Typically I start with common parts and ONLY make a change when a change is REQUIRED. I never start of with anything but standard stuff. Adding unneeded complexity typically has adverse effects. Just my two cents . . . FWIW
 

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So I've never tried this before but I was thinking about doing it on one of my rifles that's a little over-gassed.

Could you just punch the back of the buffer off and add weight until you got the right ejection?
 

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So I've never tried this before but I was thinking about doing it on one of my rifles that's a little over-gassed.

Could you just punch the back of the buffer off and add weight until you got the right ejection?
You will have to remove steel weights and add tungsten in their place. This is actually the way I do it. I bought an H3 which has 3 tungsten weights in it then you can tailor the buffer to your rifle.
 

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I just have to ask how you know you need an H2? Typically I start with common parts and ONLY make a change when a change is REQUIRED. I never start of with anything but standard stuff. Adding unneeded complexity typically has adverse effects. Just my two cents . . . FWIW
Thank you, I generally agree with you but I am building a 10.5 SBR to be used primarily with a suppressor. I asked a few people what buffer and tube I needed because of the short barrel. All I have ever used was the standard buffer on my other builds. One person I asked was a suppressor dealer/manufacturer. He built the same rifle with a suppressor and the other was the barrel supplier they both told me to use the H2 buffer. I also looked on line at what others have and what I found was the same recommendation.
I am in uncharted territory and am relying on a few others that know more than I or have gone the same direction.
I have a standard buffer and will try that first though until I get a stamp for the suppressor..
 

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Thank you, I generally agree with you but I am building a 10.5 SBR to be used primarily with a suppressor. I asked a few people what buffer and tube I needed because of the short barrel. All I have ever used was the standard buffer on my other builds. One person I asked was a suppressor dealer/manufacturer. He built the same rifle with a suppressor and the other was the barrel supplier they both told me to use the H2 buffer. I also looked on line at what others have and what I found was the same recommendation.
I am in uncharted territory and am relying on a few others that know more than I or have gone the same direction.
I have a standard buffer and will try that first though until I get a stamp for the suppressor..
The proper way to do it is run a standard buffer and spring and use an adjustable gas block. Preferably one with clickable adjustments like the Syrac or SLR. Then you can tune the gas port size properly to each load which will help maintain good accuracy and reduce felt recoil.


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You will have to remove steel weights and add tungsten in their place. This is actually the way I do it. I bought an H3 which has 3 tungsten weights in it then you can tailor the buffer to your rifle.
Perfect!

I have 2 H buffers and I need an H2 and a carbine. I just gotta swap 1 tungsten weight around and spend my money on something else!
 

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The proper way to do it is run a standard buffer and spring and use an adjustable gas block. Preferably one with clickable adjustments like the Syrac or SLR. Then you can tune the gas port size properly to each load which will help maintain good accuracy and reduce felt recoil.


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Again - I never introduce complexity where none is actually needed. I run a 12.3" 6.8 suppressed using standard parts. Again - just my input from experience and YMMV.
 

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Again - I never introduce complexity where none is actually needed. I run a 12.3" 6.8 suppressed using standard parts. Again - just my input from experience and YMMV.
Thanks for your input. That's where I will start. If it works great. If not I know what steps to take to get it working.
Jack
 

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Again - I never introduce complexity where none is actually needed. I run a 12.3" 6.8 suppressed using standard parts. Again - just my input from experience and YMMV.
It's not adding complexity to construct the flow of gas to proper flow. It keeps the BCG from premature unlock which hurts accuracy and lessens the recoil impulse as well.


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It's not adding complexity to construct the flow of gas to proper flow. It keeps the BCG from premature unlock which hurts accuracy and lessens the recoil impulse as well.


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And how can you possibly tell that adding that complexity is actually needed before you actually build and fire it?
 

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The proper way to do it is run a standard buffer and spring and use an adjustable gas block. Preferably one with clickable adjustments like the Syrac or SLR. Then you can tune the gas port size properly to each load which will help maintain good accuracy and reduce felt recoil.


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Bingo! Best advice in this thread.

So in lightweight builds, most of us use lightweight carriers, buffers and other parts as well. I use an adjustable gas block to adjust the gas, not heavy buffers. Heavy buffers are bandaids and adjustable gas block is a cure. My 1/2 cent!
 

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And how can you possibly tell that adding that complexity is actually needed before you actually build and fire it?
If you are building an upper that is ported to shoot properly unsuppressed it will have significant added pressure suppressed. So yes it'll be needed to run suppressed.

Also each round will have different pressure curves. Part of the accuracy equation is least allowable gas possible to properly cycle the weapon for that given round. So you can port perfect for one caliber or port well for a range and then add adjustability to properly fine tune for each round. Is this necessary? No. Will it help, yes. Does it require more work by the end user? Absolutely.

Every rifle I own runs adjustable gas blocks. The 90gr ttsx and 120sst both will run wide open (what the barrel is ported for) but with fine tuning of the block (each round has a different settings) run better. This is unsuppressed btw.

Remember I build hundreds of these a year and we understand the differences in port sizing, gas flow and pressure curves do for accuracy. Also the effect a suppressor will do as we shoot both unsuppressed and suppressed.

There is good enough and it'll work and then there is what we strive for in every upper we put out. And we a remote than willing to share that info to constantly help the guys on this forum. We dont do good enough.


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Bingo! Best advice in this thread.

So in lightweight builds, most of us use lightweight carriers, buffers and other parts as well. I use an adjustable gas block to adjust the gas, not heavy buffers. Heavy buffers are bandaids and adjustable gas block is a cure. My 1/2 cent!
Exactly.


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If you are building an upper that is ported to shoot properly unsuppressed it will have significant added pressure suppressed. So yes it'll be needed to run suppressed.

Also each round will have different pressure curves. Part of the accuracy equation is least allowable gas possible to properly cycle the weapon for that given round. So you can port perfect for one caliber or port well for a range and then add adjustability to properly fine tune for each round. Is this necessary? No. Will it help, yes. Does it require more work by the end user? Absolutely.

Every rifle I own runs adjustable gas blocks. The 90gr ttsx and 120sst both will run wide open (what the barrel is ported for) but with fine tuning of the block (each round has a different settings) run better. This is unsuppressed btw.

Remember I build hundreds of these a year and we understand the differences in port sizing, gas flow and pressure curves do for accuracy. Also the effect a suppressor will do as we shoot both unsuppressed and suppressed.

There is good enough and it'll work and then there is what we strive for in every upper we put out. And we a remote than willing to share that info to constantly help the guys on this forum. We dont do good enough.


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Yeah - we agree to disagree. A Adjustable gas block on EVERY rifle for you, and not a single one for me.
 

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I am not a professional in any field of mechanics or engineering but to me if a gas operated system is over gassed it is just common sense to restrict the amount of gas being used. As the gas port is a specific size this means you need an adjustable/tunable gas block. Adding heavier buffers or springs does not address the problem but only addresses the symptoms.

This is just my 2 cents and the way I build mine.
 

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The proper way to do it is run a standard buffer and spring and use an adjustable gas block. Preferably one with clickable adjustments like the Syrac or SLR. Then you can tune the gas port size properly to each load which will help maintain good accuracy and reduce felt recoil.


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This ^^^^^^^

I have ran both with a suppressed SBR. It also seemed backwards to run a heavier buffer to help overgassing/premature unlock. Plus it was much easier to tune the rifle at the range on the fly without opening the rifle up to swap buffers. Or invest in the number of different weight buffers, and swaping internal buffer weights. Now all my rifles that may run suppressed have adj gas blocks (syrac gen2) then I just keep a log of how many clicks to run suppressed or non suppressed.
 
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