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It depends on what you are shooting and your scope. Do you know the adjustment range of your scope?
If you are thinking long range sometime then go for it you can always use it later in life if you don't need it right away. 20MOA cant is pretty popular.

I would highly advice to stay away from any kind of receiver that "Bites" on the receiver like the larue.
They are easier to take off but eventually they bite too much.

Look for other options. What type of scope do you have. I like to avoid too much cantilever and have more meat wiht a heavy scope and lots of pounding.
These might be harder to open and close but they do not bite on the receiver.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/2626393212/american-defense-recon-sw-quick-release-scope-mount-picatinny-style-20-moa-elevated-ar-15-flattop-matte?cm_vc=ProductFinding

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/2626191678/american-defense-recon-quick-release-extended-scope-mount-picatinny-style-20-moa-elevated-ar-15-flat-top-matte?cm_vc=ProductFinding

I don't really have experience with this one..

http://warnescopemounts.com/new-20-moa-msr-mount/


Do some more research and see what others are using. The good thing about midway is if you are not happy they take it back no questions asked.
 

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I'm not currently shooting beyond 200 yards, so I'm speaking from my research not my practical experience, but I am good at math and I have stayed at a Holiday Inn...

According to the Hornady website, the 7mm-08 with 200 yard zero will be about -40 inches at 500 yards. A 20 MOA cant will put you at -100 inches, which means you are still dialing "UP" at 500 yards. I don't think the 7mm-08 will drop below 20MOA until you get past 600 yards. Factor in the fact that the scope axis is about 2.6" above the bore axis, and you may not hit a 20 MOA "come up" until 800 yards (if I entered the data right in the Hornady ballistic calculator). Will you routinely be shooting that far? If you plan to do a lot of shooting around 1,000 yards, than the cant may make sense. Depending on your scope though, you could run out of "UP" on the close-in distances if using a 20 MOA mount (watch the Magpul DVD on Precision Rifle and you'll see Travis Haley run out of "UP" elevation on his rig). I think the 7mm-08 is a flat enough shooter that you probably don't need the cant.

I suggest you check out the Bobro Engineering mounts. Fantastic mounts and they won't chew up your pic rail.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks for the help so far. I'm not understanding how a LaRue will tear up the receiver while the other quick release mounts won't.

I plan on shooting this rifle (someday, with adequate training/practice) to the limits of the 7mm-08. For now, 7-800 regularly. It's probably just going to be a range toy when finished. I have a 6.8 and several 5.56 flavors for up close work.

I don't have scope bought yet, but most likely a 4.5-14 or 3.5-10 power.
 

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If you buy the right scope for 800-1000 yards you will not need the canted rail.

I didn't say that it ruins the receiver but it "Bites" on the receiver and some people might not like it, let me explain.....

Larue speed lever uses a crude design with small steel cams that are biting on the reciever. This is how this is designed.
It is not a bad mount but, "by design", it is not the best one could do neither. I don't care about blemishes and dings
on my rifles but I also don't want to be doing them on purpose. This depends on the hardness and finishing on the receivers
but I don't think this is the most solid design anyway.




Other designs provide a larger and wider surface area in one piece or two piece bars cut to match the rail's lip that offer even
pressure all around. Nothing preses and rotates at the same time using a small area against the receiver therefore
"biting" on it and relying on that small area for support.
Instead the tear and wear goes to that piece that is designed for that purpose, and not the receiver. IMO the way it should be.





I hope this helps.
 

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I have an opinion that probably will get a little flame, but here goes.

Get a 20 MOA mount and try it with your scope. As long as you can still zero at the shortest range you will be shooting (200 yards is about right for me), there is no downside to the 20 MOA mount. It allows you to hit at longer ranges without buying a scope that requires a second mortgage on your home.

IMHO, there is no reason to use a quick release mount on a range toy such as you describe. Buy a quality conventional mount, locktite the bolts, apply proper torque, and go shoot without worrying about it coming loose.
 

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That is a good point. Is it the QD system even needed? Only the op can determine that.
There are many mounts that are more solid than a long cantilever sometimes too long and too thin.
A decent 7.08 round like a hornday 162gr amax will need less than 10 mils elevation at 1000 yards.
Many entry level yet nice LR scopes one can find below $1.5K that will not need a canted rail to provide plenty of adjustment.
Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for imparting your wisdom guys. It's really useful. I'm the type of shooter that has very good physical shooting ability, but not much equipment knowledge.

The comments about needing a quick release made me think about how little I remove VFZ Larue red dot mount. Basically, a couple times to test hand loads in the rifle it's on. I do have the option with the Larue of not getting a quick release. Those pics cleared up the differences in mounting.
 
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