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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I'm about to order my 6.8 dies and I was looking at getting RCBS dies but i'm now seeing two options and i'm not sure what to get. something tells me taper but wanted to see what you guys thought.
 

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I only use the lee fcd for a light crimp. You would have to seat to the cannelure to roll crimp and a lot of us on here don't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So newb question, does it matter what rcbs dies I get then? Both sets should be able to seat a mullet without crimping correct?
 

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So newb question, does it matter what rcbs dies I get then? Both sets should be able to seat a mullet without crimping correct?
I dont have much experience with mullets but either will seat a bullet just fine :a16:
 

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Is there a particular reason you need/want to crimp? The neck tension is certainly more than enough to hold the bullet snug.
 

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Hey guys,

I'm about to order my 6.8 dies and I was looking at getting RCBS dies but i'm now seeing two options and i'm not sure what to get. something tells me taper but wanted to see what you guys thought.
You don't crimp bottleneck cartridges. The Hornady dies are also better than RCBS because of the alignment sleeve on the seater die.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Is there a particular reason you need/want to crimp? The neck tension is certainly more than enough to hold the bullet snug.
No. I'm new to this so didn't know it would be enough. Happened to see a difference in the dies and didn't know which I'd need.
 

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You don't crimp bottleneck cartridges. The Hornady dies are also better than RCBS because of the alignment sleeve on the seater die.
That is good info. I haven't used hornady dies and was wondering how much that alignment sleeve you speak of helps with flat base bullets?
 

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In a semi auto you should check your coal after cycling a few rounds to make sure you have enough neck tension to keep the coal from changing. A light crimp with a Lee fcd doesn't hurt anything and can actually help reduce es.
 

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While its true you dont have to crimp bottle neck rifle cartridges.
If you were creating shtf stock you could crimp to the canalure with a roll crimp for battle rounds.
This is the only use for the roll crimp in the dies I see.
Since you cant crimp a primer though it only gets half the job done.

Now the Lee Factory Crimp die is a whole different thing.
Its not so much for bullet retention as it is to even out neck tension differences in brass with different round counts on it.
Unless your keeping your brass sorted by round count, resizing with bushing dies and annealing every 3 loadings or so.
The LFC die can even out the differences in neck tension and lower your ES.
I can feel the difference in seating pressures in some instances due to how much the brass is worked or not worked.
Freshly annealed brass that is properly sized will benefit the least from this of course.
So the LFC die can make the pain in the rear of keeping brass sorted by round count less of a pain by allowing you to not sort and even out the neck tension on brass with varying degrees of memory due to different degrees of being worked.
The LFC die also is not so susceptible to trim length as other methods of crimping.
I always want my brass trimmed to the same length as this helps keep neck tension even.
I trim to 1.682 and check it each time I process a case.

I use the LFC on some loads and not on others.
I will always try it when trying to get the final dial in on a load, especially if its accurate but seems to have an ES above single digits or low teens.

If you dont have an annealer the LFC die can be your friend.
 

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While its true you dont have to crimp bottle neck rifle cartridges.
If you were creating shtf stock you could crimp to the canalure with a roll crimp for battle rounds.
This is the only use for the roll crimp in the dies I see.
Since you cant crimp a primer though it only gets half the job done.

Now the Lee Factory Crimp die is a whole different thing.
Its not so much for bullet retention as it is to even out neck tension differences in brass with different round counts on it.
Unless your keeping your brass sorted by round count, resizing with bushing dies and annealing every 3 loadings or so.
The LFC die can even out the differences in neck tension and lower your ES.
I can feel the difference in seating pressures in some instances due to how much the brass is worked or not worked.
Freshly annealed brass that is properly sized will benefit the least from this of course.
So the LFC die can make the pain in the rear of keeping brass sorted by round count less of a pain by allowing you to not sort and even out the neck tension on brass with varying degrees of memory due to different degrees of being worked.
The LFC die also is not so susceptible to trim length as other methods of crimping.
I always want my brass trimmed to the same length as this helps keep neck tension even.
I trim to 1.682 and check it each time I process a case.

I use the LFC on some loads and not on others.
I will always try it when trying to get the final dial in on a load, especially if its accurate but seems to have an ES above single digits or low teens.

If you dont have an annealer the LFC die can be your friend.
Does using the crimp tool change your max load pressure or velocity. If I have a good accuracy node without a crimp will it change with a crimp.
 

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Does using the crimp tool change your max load pressure or velocity. If I have a good accuracy node without a crimp will it change with a crimp.
Yes and no.

If you do a light crimp I have seen no increase in either speed or pressure from the crimp.
I have seen it shrink a group slightly.

If you were to crimp excessively you could increase the pressure of the load as the projectile would have more resistance to move and pressure could climb more before the projectile starts to move.
You would have to visibly crimp so hard as to deform the projectile though for this to happen.

The goal with the LFC die is to just do a light crimp to even out neck tension, not to increase projectile retention beyond what proper neck tension would hold the projectile.
I crimp just enough to see on the brass visibly that its is being crimped, however not enough to see any marks on the projectile itself or to deform the projectile in any way.
 

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Yes and no.

If you do a light crimp I have seen no increase in either speed or pressure from the crimp.
I have seen it shrink a group slightly.

If you were to crimp excessively you could increase the pressure of the load as the projectile would have more resistance to move and pressure could climb more before the projectile starts to move.
You would have to visibly crimp so hard as to deform the projectile though for this to happen.

The goal with the LFC die is to just do a light crimp to even out neck tension, not to increase projectile retention beyond what proper neck tension would hold the projectile.
I crimp just enough to see on the brass visibly that its is being crimped, however not enough to see any marks on the projectile itself or to deform the projectile in any way.
is this done just by feel or do you set your die to any particular spot
 
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