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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Trying not to completely high jack another thread I thought this may help some newer shooters.
IMHO, there are 3 types of recoil. There are many ways to describe or define recoil. This is what makes sense to me. One is r/t recoil operated weapons so we won't discuss it here. The 2 in this conversation are push and slap. There can be variables with each and possibly a combination may be felt by some with heavy cal recoiling autos.
Meat n taters
Less rifle weight = more recoil. No way around it. If all other variables are consistent, the lighter the weapon the greater the recoil.
In respect to ammo. The heavier the projectile the greater the recoil. Ex: 200gr 308 is going to kick more than a 150gr in the same rifle.

Push is easier to stay on target and make follow up shots. A "quick slap" is more abrupt and brings line of sight off target and slows follow up.
Heavier reciprocating mass = more push less slap
Lighter the recipecating mass = more slap less push
Shorter the "stroke" bolt travel less felt recoil
Further the bolt has to travel the more difficult to keep on target.
With auto's the gas system can be adjusted to slightly lessen recoil. The downside being the less gas exhibiting force on the bolt, the more prone to malfunction. It is easier for the reciprocating mass to overcome debris and poor mechanical tolerance with greater force/ gas.
As an example, I have several blowback 9mm pcc. The one that is 100% reliable with all ammo is also the one with the most felt recoil. The softest shooting rifle is short stroked with a light wire spring and an extra 1×1.2" slug in front of the 10oz buffer. I can run a plate rack faster than you can say it and have less the 1" follow up doubles with it. BUT.. It needs to be cleaned and lubed every 5-6 mags or it will ftf.
So what we do is try to find a suitable combination somewhere in the middle that leaves us comfortable with reliability leaving acceptable recoil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
With bolt guns or singles:
I have found many ways to deal with recoil when it was required.
Weight added to the rear of a stock can lessen felt recoil. The further forward you put weight the less "jump" the rifle has with it's recoil. If you are shooting offhand then you want the weight up close. On a bag, bipod or deerstand rail you want the weight in the handguard.
Muzzle brakes are great IF, you do not fire the rifle without adequate earpro... They can significantly reduce recoil. I would suggest side ports/ cuts and not linear. There are some great internet test out their with measured data on the various types available. Linear brakes do very little to reduce recoil while causing more blast and noise. I would never recommend a brake for home defence. At the range or hunting with muffs in a stand then ok.
One thing to mention is a TOO soft and long but pad can be detrimental. The rifle can then move further rearward increasing the push feel. "May also split your eyebrow".
 

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Love my CMMG 10mm Banshee that I made an SBR. Very reliable and soft shooting. So far my experience with DI AR style rifles had been to get an adjustable gas as most are overgassed on purpose. I have just started using brakes but so far I like the SI King comp I am running. Several people have commented on the lack of recoil in my builds
 

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Yep, adjustable gas block is the key to taking the slap out of the push. Getting full bolt/ buffer travel without having the buffer slam, but instead just kiss, the back of the buffer tube. It's a pretty noticeable difference in recoil when you find the spot.
 

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Adjustable gas block, light weight BCG, and lighter buffer spring, same buffer.
Adjust the gas as low as you can go without short stroking and I like the King Comp muzzle device
I have very acceptable recoil for me.
 

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How you shoulder a rifle has a lot to do with felt recoil. Stock design and fit has a lot to do with how you shoulder the rifle.

I have two lever action rifles chambered in 444 marlin. The Marlin 336 feels like kinda like I’m shooting my couch. The recoil is heavy, firm but comfortable. I have shot it all day. The Winchester 94 is only about a half a pound lighter but our blessed mother of all things gentle put a curse on that thing. Recoil is a hard sharp punch. Purple jelly bruised shoulder with just a few rounds. I have to hunch over the ‘94 to get behind the sights. It pushes the more pointed butt stock out of my shoulder pocket and further down my chest.

AR rifle design contributes to more felt recoil and barrel rise. All AR15 sized cartridges are otherwise mild recoilers in traditional rifles. The big round buffer tube extends at the top of and inline through the stock. A squared off butt stocks extends below it. This concentrates the recoil energy to a small point to rotate around. To get behind optics or sights A lot of your face needs to be in contact with the fat buffer tube and/or your head cocked sideways. You get a slap in the face as well as a hit in the shoulder.
 
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I'm right eye/right hand.
Shot bolt, pump and falling block long guns all my life. Shoulder replacement brought all that to a screeching halt!
Several years earlier, I built an Anderson AR in 6.8mm. It was either shoot the AR or learn to shoot lefty. 😖
I went the AR route. 16" bbl and DI.
Recoil is very acceptable. Even on the bench.
For a shotgun, I went from pump to an antique Rem "Sportsman" 16 gauge with light field loads. The proper ring setup was imperative since it is recoil operated.
What little shotgunning I do, it works great....BUT....I would NOT want to spend a day at skeet or trap with it! LOL!
 
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