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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
PLEASE DO NOT over clean the MELONITE treated barrels. They do not need a "break in". Run 1 dry patch down the bore to remove any dust or grit that may have accumulated in the bore during shipping and building. Clean the protective oil out the chamber. It will be brown because of the Melonite treatment mixing with the oil. Start shooting and do not clean the barrel until accuracy drops off or copper fouling appears which should be the same time. If you have any questions call 423-353-1107. You will see the best results following these instructions. The barrel will never settle down if it is cleaned too much.

ETA- Cleaning to the bare metal may promote copper fouling.
 

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PLEASE DO NOT over clean the barrels. They do not need a "break in". Run 1 dry patch down the bore to remove any dust or grit that may have accumulated in the bore during shipping and building. Clean the protective oil out the chamber. It will be brown because of the Melonite treatment mixing with the oil. Start shooting and do not clean the barrel until accuracy drops off or copper fouling appears which should be the same time. If you have any questions call 423-353-1107. You will see the best results following these instructions. The barrel will never settle down if it is cleaned too much.
What is an estimate of the number of rounds with a new Barrel that you might want to think about cleaning it.
 

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What is an estimate of the number of rounds with a new Barrel that you might want to think about cleaning it.
clean only when it copper fouls/looses accuracy http://ar15performance.com/faqs

lots of info on his page, even a pretty straight forward explanation on "barrel break in and cleaning"
NEW BARREL Cleaning and break in
AFTER building the upper run a patch through the bore to remove the protective oil, grit and dust that accumulated during shipping and building the upper to make sure there are no metal particles that may destroy your barrel on the first shot. DO NOT try to remove the black surface, that helps keep copper fouling down and provides a barrier between the copper bullets and the bare metal. Clean the protective oil out of the chamber. It will be brown, the oil mixes with the Melonite. Do not leave any excess oil in the chamber or barrel after cleaning or before shooting. Melonite treated barrels usually do not copper foul like stainless barrels and no "break in" is needed. If(IF is the key word) there is a little copper fouling, use a good foaming copper cleaner when you come back from the range. A blue patch means there is some copper fouling in the bore so you should repeat the process until the patch comes out white. 1 patch with solvent to remove harsh copper cleaner thenrun 1 patch with alcohol. Then 1 patch with light oil like Rem oil or WD40. Then follow with 1 dry patch to remove the excess oil. The barrel will copper foul less and become easier /faster to clean each time. When the day arrives that you clean and no blue comes out you can ease off of the cleaning and shoot until the barrel loses accuracy, when it does clean it again with copper remover. Keeping the copper out so a good layer of carbon can coat the bore is the objective.
 

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I cleaned my brand new barrel very simply. We put a bronze brush down the bore ONCE, to make sure there was no "tag" from drilling the gas port (there wasn't). We then put cotton patches down the barrel, and it took about 8-10 pushes of the jag down the bore to get it to come out clean. That's it. It was clean and ready to go. All the stuff on the patches were the brown-ish colored wetness, and the last 4-5 patches were just slight traces, from down in the grooves.

Over-cleaning barrels is the primary reason of ruin for a barrel. The military wants clean barrels because they used to issue corrosive ammo. When that ended in the 50s, they continued cleaning the barrels unnecessarily frequently, perhaps to make the replacement barrel contractors rich?

I have not gathered enough data yet, but in my barrel, once we cleaned it, and before it was shot at all, we soaked a bore mop in "milk." "Milk" is Hexagonal Boron Nitride (HBN) diluted in rubbing alcohol. With the bore so coated, I also coated the bullets with HBN before loading them. I've fired less than 50 rounds so far, but hope to have more information in the next week or two.

The best part of the HBN combined with Melonite is that I anticipate these barrels lasting a LONG time. Melonite is extremely resilient/hard and so resists wear better than any other barrel, giving extended life. HBN fills in all of the micro-pores in the barrel, thus eliminating most of the little spots copper can grip to make deposits. In addition, it's "slickness" comes from the microscopic make up of the material shearing very easily, thus the bullets slide along the barrel easier than naked bullets. HBN has been tested and found in some tests to extend barrel life 20% and extend intervals between cleanings greatly.

It's very easy to use. So far I'm very impressed. I'm hoping to get as much as 50% additional barrel life with these two factors combined.
 

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When I know my guns will be sitting a while, I use a chamber brush then run a boresnake with some oil on it down 2 or 3 times.

Is that over doing it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When I know my guns will be sitting a while, I use a chamber brush then run a boresnake with some oil on it down 2 or 3 times.

Is that over doing it?
I don't think so.
Everyone has their own ideas about cleaning, I think cleaning to the bare metal with strong solvents can cause copper fouling.
 

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I think H is right. About the only time I clean my barrels is when I first get them. I usually just run a couple patches to get any left over stuff out then run a patch of oil then wipe the barrel dry. And I've not noted excessive cooper fouling in any of my ARP barrels. Works for me since I hate since I hate cleaning firearms. I tend to clean when I start having cycling problems.
 

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I just run a solvent patch down the tube, let sit for 5 minutes. Then one dry patch followed with 3 pulls with a snake. Then one patch of alcohol followed by a dry patch, then one patch with a couple of drops of gun oil.

Not sure if this recommend but is my normal cleaning process for all my barrels. Only when I cannot regain accuracy I will try copper fouling remover, but this is not in my normal cleaning process just when I am having problems with accuracy with a barrel that has alot of rounds shot.
 

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so after my range session of about 60 rounds. i come home and run a patch with hoppes #9 and and then a dry patch. then some rem oil and a dry patch. now i look at the barrel and see a small amount of streaks on the lands or the rifling. i assume this is copper. but you are saying i should not worry about this. let it go. and i also see a lot of carbon build up on the muzzle. let this be as well???? it is hard for me to leave it but it usually takes copper cleaner and more patches to get those removed. if it is best to leave it, i am happy to not do the extra work.

thanks
eric
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
so after my range session of about 60 rounds. i come home and run a patch with hoppes #9 and and then a dry patch. then some rem oil and a dry patch. now i look at the barrel and see a small amount of streaks on the lands or the rifling. i assume this is copper. but you are saying i should not worry about this. let it go. and i also see a lot of carbon build up on the muzzle. let this be as well???? it is hard for me to leave it but it usually takes copper cleaner and more patches to get those removed. if it is best to leave it, i am happy to not do the extra work.

thanks
eric
If it was shooting well when you left the range and you plan to shoot again in a week or 2 I wouldn't do anything. Years ago I had a 6.5-08AI, Mike Rock barrel, AICS chassis, pivot shoe Timney trigger, Nightforce scope. It shot great at the range but every time I cleaned it took 8-10 shots before it would settle down and group again.

If it has small amounts of copper showing but it is shooting well I would leave it, the copper may get covered by carbon and continue to shoot well. If the accuracy gets worse I would clean it then start all over with the fouling shots. I've been using lock lube with graphite as a pre foul lube. It seems like the carbon lays down quicker and I get less copper fouling.

Everyone has their own idea about cleaning. Try some different things and see what works for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
The streaks I am seeing could they be carbon. Or is that most likely copper. Thanks for all your help and advice with these details
Stick a q tip down in the bore, it will show color better than a flashlight. It could be that the bore is black and the lands are silver. When looking through a borescope the area on each side of the lands is jet black because the bullets don't touch there, That makes the tops of the lands and the centers of the groove lighter in color.
To clarify, the Q tip reflects just enough light to see the bore where a flash light can be too bright.
 

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Barrel Break-In Procedure I've Always Used

I've always had great luck using the Weatherby break-in procedure even on AR platforms.

TWO BOX BARREL BREAK-IN

This barrel break-in procedure requires two boxes of ammunition to complete. Start out by shooting one round at a time, cleaning the barrel thoroughly after each round and allowing it to cool. This process should be followed for a total of ten rounds.

Then take the remaining thirty rounds and shoot ten three shot groups, cleaning the barrel thoroughly after each group and allowing it to cool completely before firing the next group. Once ten, three shot groups have been fired the barrel is adequately broken in. At this point the rifle can be sighted in and used.

Keep in mind when they say 'cleaning the barrel thoroughly' - I've modified this to be simply running a bronze brush down with 'Butch's Bore Shine' (I've found to be better than H#9 in leaving copper in the places where you want it) down 1-3 times, followed by a bore mop to soak up excess liquid. (No patches needed) A pause for cooling between shot groups. I've seen many guns walk groups into quarter - 1/2 dollar size groups @100 YDS on rounds 15+ on a new barrel.

I've always kept a bore mop for both solvent & oil for each caliber. I don't run the mop with oil through until I store it after a range or hunting session. I only put 2-4 drops of gun oil on the mop or on a bore snake to prevent any rust from forming.

In my experience I've never went back with heavy solvents or long soaks, allowing the copper from the bullets to fill into all the micro-pores in the barrel bore.
 

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I've always had great luck using the Weatherby break-in procedure even on AR platforms.

TWO BOX BARREL BREAK-IN

This barrel break-in procedure requires two boxes of ammunition to complete. Start out by shooting one round at a time, cleaning the barrel thoroughly after each round and allowing it to cool. This process should be followed for a total of ten rounds.

Then take the remaining thirty rounds and shoot ten three shot groups, cleaning the barrel thoroughly after each group and allowing it to cool completely before firing the next group. Once ten, three shot groups have been fired the barrel is adequately broken in. At this point the rifle can be sighted in and used.

Keep in mind when they say 'cleaning the barrel thoroughly' - I've modified this to be simply running a bronze brush down with 'Butch's Bore Shine' (I've found to be better than H#9 in leaving copper in the places where you want it) down 1-3 times, followed by a bore mop to soak up excess liquid. (No patches needed) A pause for cooling between shot groups. I've seen many guns walk groups into quarter - 1/2 dollar size groups @100 YDS on rounds 15+ on a new barrel.

I've always kept a bore mop for both solvent & oil for each caliber. I don't run the mop with oil through until I store it after a range or hunting session. I only put 2-4 drops of gun oil on the mop or on a bore snake to prevent any rust from forming.

In my experience I've never went back with heavy solvents or long soaks, allowing the copper from the bullets to fill into all the micro-pores in the barrel bore.
Pretty much what I've had luck with. Anything close to this is good. I start sighting in right away with 1st shot while i'm at it.
 

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Cleaning..... Ah my most hated past time. I think as much as I shoot I may clean mine once every few months.

I use Sweet's 7.62 for fouling then CLP afterwards. Wipe everything off and then a lite coating of CLP for lube.

None of my barrels see any metal brissled brush in the chamber or rifling. Only the extension and barely at that. That's why I keep Q-tips and tooth brushes
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I've always had great luck using the Weatherby break-in procedure even on AR platforms.

TWO BOX BARREL BREAK-IN

This barrel break-in procedure requires two boxes of ammunition to complete. Start out by shooting one round at a time, cleaning the barrel thoroughly after each round and allowing it to cool. This process should be followed for a total of ten rounds.

Then take the remaining thirty rounds and shoot ten three shot groups, cleaning the barrel thoroughly after each group and allowing it to cool completely before firing the next group. Once ten, three shot groups have been fired the barrel is adequately broken in. At this point the rifle can be sighted in and used.

Keep in mind when they say 'cleaning the barrel thoroughly' - I've modified this to be simply running a bronze brush down with 'Butch's Bore Shine' (I've found to be better than H#9 in leaving copper in the places where you want it) down 1-3 times, followed by a bore mop to soak up excess liquid. (No patches needed) A pause for cooling between shot groups. I've seen many guns walk groups into quarter - 1/2 dollar size groups @100 YDS on rounds 15+ on a new barrel.

I've always kept a bore mop for both solvent & oil for each caliber. I don't run the mop with oil through until I store it after a range or hunting session. I only put 2-4 drops of gun oil on the mop or on a bore snake to prevent any rust from forming.

In my experience I've never went back with heavy solvents or long soaks, allowing the copper from the bullets to fill into all the micro-pores in the barrel bore.
Why would you want to purposely leave copper fouling in your barrel?
 

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Why would you want to purposely leave copper fouling in your barrel?
+1 !

I use wipe out foaming cleaner when I clean--- you will never have to use a brush again with this stuff, no "scrubbing" just foam-wait-patch-repeat until clean , I love it



less chance of screwing up your barrel with a brush when you don't need them
 
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