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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Het folks! Bebe here!
I haven't posted here in a long while.
I'm "snow birding" in south Texas with my youngest kid.
Interestingly, we keep seeing this creature along the back fence.
Plant community Natural landscape Grass Plain Grassland

My apologies for the photo quality, but there is only so much you can do with a phone and a wild animal! LOL!

If you can't tell, it is a nilgai cow.

I still have my 6.8's and use them for all my rifle hunting.

Would you feel comfortable tackling a nilgai with your 6.8mm.
A big bull will push a bit over 800 pounds.
This cow probably runs around 400, give or take.

Has anyone here taken a nilgai with their 6.8..?
 

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I'm going to disagree, NO.

Most ranches, or at least use to, require a 300WM as a minimum. A lot of that is because they are very hard to get close to on the ranches so the shots are long and it is a tough animal. I friend that is a writer for the TX Parks & Wildlife magazine went on a hunt and was told the average shots to kill one was 8. That was a few years ago and she shot a 300 Weatherby Mag.
Many people are hunting them now with 338LM.
I won't say you can't kill one with a 6.8, you can kill (myth?) an elephant with a 22LR, just not a first choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm going to disagree, NO.

Most ranches, or at least use to, require a 300WM as a minimum. A lot of that is because they are very hard to get close to on the ranches so the shots are long and it is a tough animal. I friend that is a writer for the TX Parks & Wildlife magazine went on a hunt and was told the average shots to kill one was 8. That was a few years ago and she shot a 300 Weatherby Mag.
Many people are hunting them now with 338LM.
I won't say you can't kill one with a 6.8, you can kill (myth?) an elephant with a 22LR, just not a first choice.
Watched a "MeatEater" episode where Rinella took a big nilgai bull.
Can't remember what caliber he used, but it was a real cannon.

With all due respect, I won't "disagree" with you, I just don't totally agree with you.

"... The best laid plans of mice and men..... ..."


I'm not talking a "spot & stalk". I'm talking "deer stand" style hunting.
Get "up close and personal" with one and I think the 6.8mm will work just fine.

I wouldn't even "think" about sniping something that big at any appreciable range.
 

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I haven't hunted them myself but a trusted friend shared his experiences with their thick hide and toughness. Those critters didn't drop after good shots from a 7mag and .30-06. Use something bigger than a 6.8. Better for you and the animal.
 

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I see cartridge talk but no talk of bullet construction. I've never shot anything bigger than a deer, just curious why this hasn't come up?
Exactly! Big rifles with the wrong bullet and or shot placement evolve into tall tales.
 

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I have never heard of any “free range” nalgai” in S Tx. I have also never heard of anyone hunting them from a stand. If you are spending a few thousand to hunt them I would have to assume you know what to hunt with (rifle and bullet) and are also given guidance from the ranch or landowner on caliber.
I didn’t say you couldn’t kill one with a 6.8, I said it wasn’t a good choice. Being respectful to the animal for a quick kill rules out 6.8 for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I guess that all depends on your definition of "free range".
There are nilgai that aren't contained behind a "high fence". They can roam as they please, albeit on private property. TPW offers nilgai hunts on some of their WMA's. So they have expanded beyond any high fence containment areas.
Central Texas (Hill Country) has a population of fallow deer and black buck antelope that have escaped high fence operations. If they wander onto private property, you can hunt them in any manner. There is currently no nilgai season in Texas.
IIRC, these "blue bull" antelope were imported back in the 1930's because some rancher got tired of only hunting white tails.

....and yes, the 6.8 may not be the "best" choice.

Bullet construction.
Uhhmmm....? I kinda think that's a personal choice. I fell "head over heels" for the Nosler Partition back in the 70's....but.... the Partition is a very poor choice on light skinned white tails.
I killed 3 ferals with handloaded Sierra 90gr HP bullets. One shot kills
The 90 grain HP would not have been my first choice for hunting ferals, but it worked spectacularly!

So thanks, jrhtx, definitely "food for thought" and mindful considerations.
 

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There are “free range” Nilgai in Southern Texas. Pound for pound they are the hardest antelope to kill. They have thick skin, heavy bone, dense muscle and a very strong will to live.

I tried hunting them once. They do not stick around long. I saw one and could not get a shot. The friend I went with has gotten a couple and he carried a 375 H&H. We hunted them by scanning the brush with a thermal and then trying to stalk for a shot.

Personally I’ve seen three that were taken, I saw bodies but did not witness the hunt. One of the ranches, we used to do hog control for, had some for paid hunter. All took multiple shots. The heart is low and behind the front shoulder. I’m sure a 6.8 SPC could probably be used but I would use a tough bullet, an Accubond or Fusion, and take a neck shot less than 100 yards.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
There are “free range” Nilgai in Southern Texas. Pound for pound they are the hardest antelope to kill. They have thick skin, heavy bone, dense muscle and a very strong will to live.

I tried hunting them once. They do not stick around long. I saw one and could not get a shot. The friend I went with has gotten a couple and he carried a 375 H&H. We hunted them by scanning the brush with a thermal and then trying to stalk for a shot.

Personally I’ve seen three that were taken, I saw bodies but did not witness the hunt. One of the ranches, we used to do hog control for, had some for paid hunter. All took multiple shots. The heart is low and behind the front shoulder. I’m sure a 6.8 SPC could probably be used but I would use a tough bullet, an Accubond or Fusion, and take a neck shot less than 100 yards.
Yeah, pretty much my mind set. Due to old injuries and surgeries, I don't do heavy calibers any longer. That's the reason I shoot an AR. Significant recoil reduction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I've shot then with 6mm rem, 270, and 540gr arrows. They all died quickly.
Years ago, my neighbor gave me a hog. It showed up at his barn. He fed it for 3 months and nobody claimed it.
I called a friend with a family and offered him half the hog for some help.
At the hog pen, I stepped into the pen with a Ruger MK IV, brain popped the hog then cut the jugular.
While we were cleaning the hog, my friend gave me a little snicker.
Guy told him if you weren't shooting a .300 Win Mag, no need hunting ferals hogs. 😖

I do understand a .458 Win Mag for elephants and rhinos and serious armament for old Leo*!

I honestly think more people go out "overgunned" than "undergunned".

* - can't remember if it was John "Pondoro" Taylor or Wally Johnson. When he first got to Africa, he and a friend got work eliminating stock killing lions. Said he had no idea how many lions they killed with their Win M94 .30-30 Win before he realized just how undergunned they were. Thankfully, they had moved along to other work before either one got chomped.
 

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Not that my opinion matters but I would think a bullet solid copper in the 110 to 115 gr. Range would be good in the 50 to 100 yard area if possible. I'm in the dictatorship of ca. And hunt everything with 110 ttsx bullets in my 6.8. If thats all you got I might try it.
 

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I honestly think more people go out "overgunned" than "undergunned".
I hope I’m getting wiser as I get older. I am tired of chasing game that should be dead over long distances. I have learned, over-gunned is better than under-gunned. Too much is never enough for me. Good thing the 6.8 SPC hits way above it’s weight class!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I hope I’m getting wiser as I get older. I am tired of chasing game that should be dead over long distances. I have learned, over-gunned is better than under-gunned. Too much is never enough for me. Good thing the 6.8 SPC hits way above it’s weight class!
Oh, I definitely believe in "enough gun"! LOL!
Fellow I hunted with in OK wanted "MORE" gun went from a 7STW to a .30-340. Even for the largest OK whitetail, that's over gunned.
Cousin's husband down in east Texas hunts whitetails with a .338 Win Mag. That's overgunned.
Boss asked me to check a fence corner one day. I threw my .22 Hornet in the ATV gun rack and drove off.
I'm down on my knees checking a wooden post when a buck steps out about 20 yards away. He was interested in a doe standing out in a wheat field. Though the .22 Hornet did the job, that is undergunned. He field dressed 156 pounds. Put that 45 grain pill right behind his left ear. D.O.A.!
A testament to "bullet placement" being key.
 

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The 6.8 while a great round, is not up for the task of a Nilgai. I hunted down there last December on the Yturria Ranch. Took a nice white tail with my 6.8. The outfit I hunted with required a .338 Win Mag for Nilgai. They are big, and they are tough - and they taste great. Elk are easy to kill compared to these guys. Their skin (Elk) is much thinner. You want to kill, and not wound, a Nilgai, take a big gun. These big guys (biggest member of the antelope family) can run and easily clear a 6 foot fence.
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