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Have you called them? Did you use the light spring (Typically the one that is installed) or the heavier spring that comes with it? I would call them they have great customer service.
 

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I think drop in means a complete trigger group in a housing ready to drop in . Drop in assemblies used to be for those of us who prefer a single stage and those who prefer double had to swap out some or all trigger parts individually but lately I'm seeing two stage drop in complete assemblies . ___ I might revisit the two stage world now that Timminy has a 2lb fst 2lb second and I think there is a 2lb first and adjustable second out now .

Sent from my moto g(7) play using Tapatalk
 

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Yall do realize the question was about DROP-IN Triggers right?
That point seems to be missed for some reason.
I think drop in means a complete trigger group in a housing ready to drop in . Drop in assemblies used to be for those of us who prefer a single stage and those who prefer double had to swap out some or all trigger parts individually but lately I'm seeing two stage drop in complete assemblies . ___ I might revisit the two stage world now that Timminy has a 2lb fst 2lb second and I think there is a 2lb first and adjustable second out now .

Sent from my moto g(7) play using Tapatalk
Yes, they do make drop in two stages but the Larue and Geissele triggers don't fit that category.
 
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Maybe Dlenzi can clarify if it's a deal breaker if its not a true drop in. My understanding of a drop in is a unit where the hammer and trigger are contained by a housing. The LaRue of course, is not. IMO that's a good thing; probably what makes it $80 instead of $200..
 

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Maybe Dlenzi can clarify if it's a deal breaker if its not a true drop in. My understanding of a drop in is a unit where the hammer and trigger are contained by a housing. The LaRue of course, is not. IMO that's a good thing; probably what makes it $80 instead of $200..
Geissele are the same style as the LaRue and they are three times that. I paid about $120 for the Velocity and have bought a couple of Rise Armament drop ins on sale for $84 in the last year or so.
 

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I have a James Madison Tactical saber on mine. I forget the name of the straight version, but i have that on my 10mm. Both are very crisp, no slop (least not that i can feel) single stage
 

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Yall do realize the question was about DROP-IN Triggers right?
Assuming one doesn't know how to install an AR trigger, if one has already already figured out how to post in this forum, one should be able to figure out how to hop on over to Youtube or Full30.com and follow instructions on the subject.

I don't intend to be derogatory or condescending, if in fact one does not know how to install an AR trigger. I only mean to say that doing so does not require any special tools, and is fairly simple, even for a novice.

Yes, the one-piece triggers contained in a housing are easier to install than the "several loose pieces" type triggers, but if one is even remotely mechanically inclined, the installation of an AR trigger should not require a trip to the gunsmith...or possibly even a trip to the garage.
 

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Rise Armament RA 140 drop in for $120 street price is a good drop in as well as the Noreen Match Grade at $135. The Noreen is factory set at 3 pound pull which I really like a 3.0 to 3.25 pound single stage trigger for a fast moving precision shooting such as 3 Gun, precision light fighting rifle, etc. The Rise Armament is 3.5 pounds for those who are building a rifle that does not need a super light trigger but want an easy to install, crisp and responsive unit at a fair price. Honestly out of over fifty AR 15 and a dozen AR 10 builds for myself only have six single stage triggers (three installed to date) and they are premium units adjustable down to 1.5 pounds and less in my 1,000 yard 6XC, 6.5 Creed and 6.5 PRC builds.

In addition to over fifty rifles with mix of triggers from milspec single stage, two stage, target triggers, etc one of my favorites is the Hiperfire 24E which is now called the Hipertouch Elite with choice of 2.5 or 3.5 pound pull based on springs used. All Hipertouch triggers have dual hammer springs for lighting off hard military primers without fail but have a very crisp choice of pull weights. The Hipertouch Genesis (formerly Hiperfire 243G) can be set up with pull of 2.0 or 2.5 pounds based on which spring set you select from the kit. All of these triggers have 35% more energy of hammer strike on firing pin without compromising feel or light trigger pull. Just mix and match Hiperfire springs to get what you want.

When Hiperfire rebranded their 24 series to the Hipertouch ($200 to $250 retail) I was able to buy a dozen 24E's for $79 each and a dozen 243G's for $89 each. I have three dozen Colt Competition Target Triggers and three dozen Colt Competition milspec from when Colt Competition bankrupted and was able to buy the target triggers for $29 each and milspec for $19 each. Can tune the Target versions down to 2.3 to 3.0 pounds and milspec to 2.9 to 3.75 using JP spring kits and Power Custom Hammer & Sear jig for honing engagement surfaces. I have well over 150 AR triggers in my parts locker where buy in bulk when find sales and clearances. I was able to buy a dozen Franklin Armory BSFIII binary triggers for $249 each when a distributor I was using folded a couple years back and purchased all they had to get that price.

I will buy good triggers by the dozen anytime I can find a deal and can afford any trigger I want when it comes down to it. Issue with drop in triggers is same as Fostech binaries, user cannot work on them in most cases. Some are adjustable but most other than sliding the retaining pins in that's all you can do unless you work on Swiss watches for a living. I can take a standard trigger, sometimes parts from two trigger sets and springs for two other suppliers and build up a "milspec design" trigger to whatever desire I have. I do use two stage in many of my varmint builds and Jard makes a trigger I can tune down to 16 to 18 ounce pull. Issue with the Jard triggers is if do anything wrong and they are ruined as will run off with you. Hardest trigger I have ever tuned is a Jard FN FAL trigger and it takes days to set one up to get proper break without hammer doing all sorts of odd things. Mini 14 factory triggers are easy to tune and can be converted into binary triggers out of the box.

By using my hammer & sear jig to properly hone triggers and selecting proper spring kits (JP 3.5 Enhanced Reliability Kit is a favorite) I can tune almost any OEM milspec trigger to whatever pull weight I want from 3.25 to 6.0 pounds. Decent aftermarket triggers and can adjust creep, pull and travel to almost any setting one wants. Can't do this with most drop ins. What they ship is what you are stuck with. That said the Timney Daniel Horner is a stunning adjustable drop in as is the Calvin Elite. Honestly most sealed triggers to me are a function of deciding the pull weight you prefer and buy cheapest that accomplishes that goal. I have one barrel that just arrived and another just ordered that will get Timney drop ins but they are $500 to $800 barrels that need an easy to adjust trigger for 1,000 yard bench rest one day and varmints another where you need a tad more resistance.

I love to tune triggers and many AR triggers the case hardening is so thin after honing they have to be heat treated again or will wear out in a few hundred trigger cycles. When honing or polishing an AR trigger knowing when you have cut through the heat treated surface to softer internal metal is something that needs to be accounted for and ability to test hardness becomes necessary. That said I have taken a $9 spring set and some toothpaste and dropped an eight pound OEM trigger pull to four pounds with zero specialty tools. If I wamted a 3.5 pound range drop in trigger would buy the Noreen as I use a lot of their parts and all are top notch and worth much more than what they charge for their products. IMHO & YMMV
 

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Assuming one doesn't know how to install an AR trigger, if one has already already figured out how to post in this forum, one should be able to figure out how to hop on over to Youtube or Full30.com and follow instructions on the subject.

I don't intend to be derogatory or condescending, if in fact one does not know how to install an AR trigger. I only mean to say that doing so does not require any special tools, and is fairly simple, even for a novice.

Yes, the one-piece triggers contained in a housing are easier to install than the "several loose pieces" type triggers, but if one is even remotely mechanically inclined, the installation of an AR trigger should not require a trip to the gunsmith...or possibly even a trip to the garage.
None of that is really the point. There are other benefits to drop in one piece triggers;
Since the standard FCG parts pivot on the hammer and trigger pins, the hammer/sear relationship is controlled by the relative locations of those pins.
And the relative locations of those pins does vary. Different manufacturers using different equipment produce receivers with those holes on different ends of the acceptable tolerance spectrum. Assuming they’re in tolerance. For this reason, traditional format trigger manufacturers have to err on the side of excessive hammer/sear overlap to ensure safety and proper function. Installed in one receiver, a given trigger may have noticeably more or less creep than when installed in a different receiver.
None of this applies to drop-in triggers. The trigger manufacturer sets the exact relationship between hammer and sear via the housing. They can then tune that engagement, tune the spring tensions, tune the disconnector tension and overlap, tune in an overtravel stop, etc., and lock that all down. Regardless of your receiver’s trigger pin tolerances, you will have the exact trigger feel the manufacturer intended. Additionally, a factory-assembled drop-in unit allows for departures from the traditional fire control group (FCG) geometry and layout. A handful of the units tested here would be physically impossible to assemble on only one hammer pin and one trigger pin, and those manufacturers feel that they’ve improved on the standard geometry and function in various ways.
 

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Assuming one doesn't know how to install an AR trigger, if one has already already figured out how to post in this forum, one should be able to figure out how to hop on over to Youtube or Full30.com and follow instructions on the subject.

I don't intend to be derogatory or condescending, if in fact one does not know how to install an AR trigger. I only mean to say that doing so does not require any special tools, and is fairly simple, even for a novice.

Yes, the one-piece triggers contained in a housing are easier to install than the "several loose pieces" type triggers, but if one is even remotely mechanically inclined, the installation of an AR trigger should not require a trip to the gunsmith...or possibly even a trip to the garage.
I was not aware you could get individual springs and triggers to install that would give you a single stage 3 lb or 2 lb 1st 2 lb 2ond stage . I was under the impression you had to install a drop in to achieve this .

Sent from my moto g(7) play using Tapatalk
 

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I find drop in triggers like a Timney a little harder to install than a regular trigger. Getting that hex screw aligned always gives me a problem. Been buying LaRue MBT's the last 5 years. Like them better. And put me in the Not a Fan of Two Stage Triggers group. I was't until I tried the LaRue MBT. At $80, hard to beat.
 

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None of that is really the point. There are other benefits to drop in one piece triggers...snip
This is an interesting point that I had not taken into account. I suppose I consider pretty much all triggers to be "drop in" until you have to break out the honing/polishing/etc tools to get them to work.
 

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I have tried Wilson Combat, Giessele and Trigger Tech. I much prefer the Trigger Tech Adaptable AR trigger. I like being able to adjust the trigger and the ability to adjust down to 2.5# is nice on my precision ARs. I prefer to run a little heavier on my carbines. Having the adjustable feature allows me to adjust when I swap uppers. Not cheap, but good clean break no matter the pull weight.
 

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I have tried Wilson Combat, Giessele and Trigger Tech. I much prefer the Trigger Tech Adaptable AR trigger. I like being able to adjust the trigger and the ability to adjust down to 2.5# is nice on my precision ARs. I prefer to run a little heavier on my carbines. Having the adjustable feature allows me to adjust when I swap uppers. Not cheap, but good clean break no matter the pull weight.
I've used each one you mentioned and I second TriggerTech but I wouldn't throw rocks at Wilson Combat TTUs and I'd add that the one Timney I own is super. Of all, the adjustable TriggerTech is my favorite.
 
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