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Discussion Starter #1
I've always used CCI 41's for my 6.8 loads and R 7 1/2's for my 223 loads.
I tried using the R 7 1/2' s in place of the 41's in a couple of my 6.8 loads.
Velocity was down 0 - 50 fps with the 7 1/2's.

My supply of 41's is a about gone.
From what I can tell the only difference between the CCI 41 and 450 is the position of the anvil.
Is this correct ?
For those that have used the 41 and the 450 have you seen any performance or accuracy difference ?
450's are $6.50 / K cheaper than the 41's.
Just wondering if the 41's are worth the extra $ ?
 

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I've always used CCI 41's for my 6.8 loads and R 7 1/2's for my 223 loads.
I tried using the R 7 1/2' s in place of the 41's in a couple of my 6.8 loads.
Velocity was down 0 - 50 fps with the 7 1/2's.

My supply of 41's is a about gone.
From what I can tell the only difference between the CCI 41 and 450 is the position of the anvil.
Is this correct ?
For those that have used the 41 and the 450 have you seen any performance or accuracy difference ?
450's are $6.50 / K cheaper than the 41's.
Just wondering if the 41's are worth the extra $ ?
That depends on how you view mil-spec when it comes to components and parts. The #41 and #450 use exactly the same cup - same hardness, same thickness. The chemical priming pellet is the exact same in both. The difference is that the anvil in the #41 is a tad shorter than the one used in the #450. That means that it takes a bit more robust strike to set it off. The reason is to help prevent the free floating fire pins in AR and other military style rifles from setting off a primer on a chambered round before the trigger is pulled. A lot of guys install lighter springs in their trigger set ups and depending on how much lighter the hammer spring is, you could get failures to fire with the mil-spec #41. My practice is to use the JP yellow trigger spring, but the standard weight hammer spring.

I have only used the #41 in my AR small primer applications (I use the #34 large primer version in my 6.8 due to Remington brass, but the same thing applies). I like the little extra bit of safety margin against a possible slam fire. Rare as they are, they can happen, particularly when things get dirty and full of crud from long shooting sessions. So, I'm willing to pay the extra. Some guys aren't. That's a choice you'll have to make for yourself.
 

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I use them both inter-changeably, they perform the same, although I did learn something about the difference today.
 

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That depends on how you view mil-spec when it comes to components and parts. The #41 and #450 use exactly the same cup - same hardness, same thickness. The chemical priming pellet is the exact same in both. The difference is that the anvil in the #41 is a tad shorter than the one used in the #450. That means that it takes a bit more robust strike to set it off. The reason is to help prevent the free floating fire pins in AR and other military style rifles from setting off a primer on a chambered round before the trigger is pulled. A lot of guys install lighter springs in their trigger set ups and depending on how much lighter the hammer spring is, you could get failures to fire with the mil-spec #41. My practice is to use the JP yellow trigger spring, but the standard weight hammer spring.

I have only used the #41 in my AR small primer applications (I use the #34 large primer version in my 6.8 due to Remington brass, but the same thing applies). I like the little extra bit of safety margin against a possible slam fire. Rare as they are, they can happen, particularly when things get dirty and full of crud from long shooting sessions. So, I'm willing to pay the extra. Some guys aren't. That's a choice you'll have to make for yourself.
I perfer to use the red hammer spring & yellow trigger spring. A little more more smack on the primer.
 

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I perfer to use the red hammer spring & yellow trigger spring. A little more more smack on the primer.
How is that different than a stock AR-15 hammer spring? Didn't know they made a red spring.
 

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How is that different than a stock AR-15 hammer spring? Didn't know they made a red spring.
its red :a32:...:
We offer four different spring set ups as listed below by application. Note that all JPFC kits now include both the yellow and red hammer springs which will allow for either 3-3.5 pound recreational/competition set up or the 3.5-4 pound tactical set up (#1 and #2 below). The red hammer spring is the minimum recommended for any military type ammunition which has low sensitivity primers and requires higher hammer velocity for full ignition reliability.
  1. 3-3.5 pound trigger pull for competition/recreational use. Kit includes yellow color coded trigger and hammer spring.
  2. 3.5-4.0 pound trigger pull for enhanced reliability and provides good ignition reliability with any ammo. The red hammer spring with yellow trigger spring is also the minimum required for a 308 AR-10 set up.
  3. 4-4.5 pound for police duty, military or any application in which 100% ignition reliability is demanded with low sensitivity primers or a heavier release is demanded by LE department requirements. May also be used for 308 AR-10 set ups. Kit includes grey hammer spring with yellow trigger spring.
  4. 4.5 pound for CMP service rifle competition. Kit includes grey hammer spring with grey trigger spring
 

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450 , 41.... same thing different package. I would like to see someone come out with some hard facts. Probably like Lite and bud light. after 2.... who cares:a10:
--cheers
 
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