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Discussion Starter #1
Building my 6.8 and will need a scope at some point...I've never used anything besides the standard 3-9 on a deer rifle so I'm looking for input. Should I go with a higher magnification? What would be a good objective size?

Not really looking for brand input, I know what brands I prefer but interested in the specs.

Thanks!
 

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Should I go with a higher magnification? What would be a good objective size?
I don't think there is a right/wrong answer, although I have never found the need for anything more than 9x or 10x for a 6.8 AR. I also prefer an objective in the 40-44mm range as well for 6.8 AR's...but that's just my preference.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
21x - that seems extreme, I don't need to see the individual hairs on the deer...
 

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21x - that seems extreme, I don't need to see the individual hairs on the deer...
Not really extreme, what is extreme is the 3.5 power on the low end and the compact physical dimensions of the scope given its range compared to other optics in its class. It is a mid priced scope with good glass if 21x seems to much I have a Ior Valdata 3-18x42 with MP8 reticle that I think you would have to spend another $1000 to get better glass.

Having a vehicle that will go 100mph doesn't mean that you have to drive 100mph all the time but the capability is there if needed.
 

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It depends on where and how you are hunting. I've never found a need for anything over 4x other than at the range. Most of the time I am hunting deer or hogs, I adjust the magnification until I feel it is optimum for conditions, then when I check to see what it is at, it's always in the 2.5-3X range. I have seen FAR more game missed or wounded due to to much magnifications, rather than to little. Either the small field of view causes them to not be able to locate the animal or all they can see is hair. My long range rifle has a 2-10X, my 6.8 has a 1-6X which goes down to a true ZERO magnification, I use that often, I very rarely ever go to 6X while hunting.
 

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When hunting I generally keep the magnification turned down in the lower range and that is dependent on the capabilities of the s​​cope (Not all scopes are created equal) what range I expect to shoot at. I think you would be surprised what the field of view is with a 34-35mm tube on a quality scope set in the 15-16 power range.

What a higher magnification helps with is it shows all the little flaws in your shooting form from breathing pattern, inconsistent grip, grip torque, trigger pull and how your contact with the rifle affects your point of aim. It basically forces a shooter to deal with the imperfections and finite details of marksmanship we all suffer from in more detail, so you will become a better shot when more focus is put into those things.

With anything familiarity with your equipment and how to properly implement it will always trump inexperience regardless of the quality of you gear.

When I expect shots to be 50 yards or less I usually have a bow in my hand anyways.
 

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I have hunted for nearly 40 years with fixed 6x scopes. First a 6x Leupold and now with a 6x Primary Arms. I find that with a fixed power every time you put the scope to your eye it is the same, and you get to where you automatically compensate for different ranges. Of course, for bench rest and long range varmints a higher power helps, but you have more time to adjust the power in those situations. In deer hunting you don't usually have time to monkey around with settings. Fixed power scopes also are less apt to have things go wrong as there is less glass and things to get knocked loose. I personally think fixed power scope are sharper for the same reason.
 

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I have hunted for nearly 40 years with fixed 6x scopes. First a 6x Leupold and now with a 6x Primary Arms. I find that with a fixed power every time you put the scope to your eye it is the same, and you get to where you automatically compensate for different ranges. Of course, for bench rest and long range varmints a higher power helps, but you have more time to adjust the power in those situations. In deer hunting you don't usually have time to monkey around with settings. Fixed power scopes also are less apt to have things go wrong as there is less glass and things to get knocked loose. I personally think fixed power scope are sharper for the same reason.
No disrespect intended I am just curious why you have limited yourself to a fixed power? I know there are strength benefits inherent in the design due to simplicity but modern optics have come a long ways in the durability department.

I first starting looking into higher quality and magnification optics after trashing two variable power scopes on a 300WM. It was a heavy barreled rifle at that not a snappy sporter wieght you would expect to pull the pants down on lesser scopes.
 

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No disrespect intended I am just curious why you have limited yourself to a fixed power? I know there are strength benefits inherent in the design due to simplicity but modern optics have come a long ways in the durability department.

I first starting looking into higher quality and magnification optics after trashing two variable power scopes on a 300WM. It was a heavy barreled rifle at that not a snappy sporter wieght you would expect to pull the pants down on lesser scopes.


I have two 3-9 power scopes in the safe, I just don't use them.
 

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It depends on what you like to do with it but also keep in mind something that is not huge not too heavy
and that would be more appropriate for a long range heavy rifle and not an AR15.
I mean unless you have an AR15 setup for long range perhaps also longer and heavier than the average
and not a carbine.

Good magnification ranges are:
1-6
2-7
2-10
3-9
3-10
3-15
4-20 ...last two not really light nor needed for most folks and the starting magnification is still ok but I like a x2 starting for multipurpose carbines.


2-7 or 2-10 have amazing alternatives with great optics and specially more versatility in the low end for close range work.

Also keep in mind that the advertised magnification might say little about the actual experience. Some lower magnification with good glass
offer a much better picture and extended FOV than others advertising higher magnification. An adjustable parallax is a plus to fulfill more
specialized roles and also help read the wind. First focal plain is also an amazing benefit for those who like to do ranging and having
an easy to adjust system with consistent units of measure so it it has MOA adjustments then MOA stadia o if it has MIL adjustments
then MIL stadia. Mil is the standard for the military and many shooters around the world.

So the actual magnification is a start point but there is nothing like good quality glass and always see if you can look
though one and ask around to see if you can actually try it.

Good entry level stuff are Weaver tactical and Vortex ... and they have FFP options.

For budget Redfield Revolution models have leupold glass and also some pretty good Burris like the E1 series.
Weaver makes a tactical one exclusive at midway that is 3-10 with the same japanese glass and tubes as the big brothers. Amazing value.
 

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I prefer 1x4 for 100yds and I leave it on 4x. I have 2x7's and 3x9's that are great but they just add size and weight to the rifle.
 

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weight

weight can sometimes come into play also, depending upon your purpose, I have a 2-7x that weighs 12 oz, a 1.5-4.5x that weighs 16 ounces, and a 3.5-14x that weighs 18ounces, I did notice that the burris DMR 3-21 weighed about 2.5 pounds...good glass often weighs more, but is often optically superior ... to me magnification needs to fit the intended purpose, If my rifle is for large game at closeer ranges due to hunting in dense vegetation then often times something in a (2-7x or 3-10x magnification suits me better ( such as elk or deer in dense trees out to 200 yards max)....If in very dense trees or dusk/dawn hunting with a max range of 150 yards then often times a low power is good (1-4x)...if hunting possibilities could be long range, such as Pronghorn on the plains or open country elk or bear hunting where a 300-500 yard shot wouldn't be out of the question then I prefer a greater magnification such as the 3.5-14 or possibly even a 5-20 BUT if there are possible close range shots then make sure you have the ability to "power down" your scope for "close quarters" engagements....I did "pass up" a shot on an elk once that was only 40 yards away as my scope was 6-18 and I couldn't "acquire" the shot picture before the animal ran away...but I may not have taken the shot anyway with a low powered scope as if the animal is moving too quickly I won't take the shot anyway
 

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Many 1-6 and 2-7 are pretty compact and light. Burris timberline 2-7 is 11oz and short. Glass is pretty decent for budget glass.
Huge eye relief and still can do close work whit both eyes opened w/o getting confused in the brain.

If one wants to shoot elk at 300 yards is not going to matter but if one is shooting small targets or chipmunks then it is going to make a huge difference.
Or even modest size targets at longer ranges. A bit extra power makes a big difference.
More versatility is good but again depends on what one wants to do.
 

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I have two 3-9 power scopes in the safe, I just don't use them.
Understood just personal preference I take it. My 16" barrel 68 has a Leupold 1-4x20 on it that is what I use for a brush or stalking rifle but I admit if I am going to do any accuracy testing with it I have a Sightron 4.5-14x44 in A.R.M.S. throw lever rings that I use, it bounces between several rifles depending on what I am doing.

The rifle with the 3.5-21x50 on it is 12 pounds without ammo in it, I have just allways preferred heavy rifles. It's not like I'm climbing Everest, or jumping out the back of a C130 with it. Let's face it do we spend more time running around in the brush shooting animals or at the range shooting paper.

I wish I was able to fire as many rounds a year in a hunting situation as target practice if I did I would likely have something with a 6-9 power top end and shave some weight off of the rifle. So my point is if we spend more time using the rifle for recreational target shooting I would rather maximize my time with an optic that is well balanced for both.
 

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I spend way, WAY more time "running around in the brush" than I do at the range, likely 20 times as much or more and that's what my rifles are for, so I set them up to be best for that and whatever that is, is what I have to work with on the range. Only exception to that is the red dot's where I do add a magnifier at the range and don't use it in the field. I am phasing out the red dots and replacing them with Leupold VX-6, 1-6X, they have a FOV nearly twice that of the Aimpoint's, when it is set at 1X and even a very big difference of FOV, between the VX-6 and 1X scopes that are actually 1.5-1.7X. I shoot a rifle at close range, just about the same way I shoot a shotgun and have shot lots of stuff on the run, sometimes flat out run, so low power suits me better. I shoot a bow and handgun the same and have shot lots of running animals(and even the occasional flying bird). If I was hunting out west, I might opt for more magnification, but I wouldn't feel I had a handicap at 6X max..
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Most of my shots will most likely be in the 100-250 yard range, so I'm thinking a 3-10 is probably still a good area to stay around, I don't want to spend the extra money to go up to 20x, just not necessary to me for a hunting rifle.
 

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Most of my shots will most likely be in the 100-250 yard range, so I'm thinking a 3-10 is probably still a good area to stay around, I don't want to spend the extra money to go up to 20x, just not necessary to me for a hunting rifle.
Regardless of what you choose the main and most important thing is you are happy with it and it does everything you want. Did I really think you would choose a 3.5-21x50 DMR scope HELL NO. But it did stimulate a realistic and more in depth optics discussion and what the merits of each are and thier role in different types of shooting. A much better discussion than just suggesting one type and waiting for the next 20 responses that are the same thing over and over just a different manufacturer.
 
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