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Discussion Starter #1
On his website, H mentions a carbon coating that forms on the inside of a barrel as part of the break-in process.

How is this different from the coating applied by Cryptic Coatings? I am specifically referring to the CVD process used to coat the Mystic Black BCGs.

http://www.crypticcoatings.com/coated-bolt-carrier-group/
 

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Discussion Starter #3
These are two totally unrelated things. The carbon inside the barrel is a byproduct from the firing of the cartridge.
They are both carbon deposits. I appreciate that they are different sources and processes.

I was thinking that if the carbon layer in the barrel adds uniformity, then why wouldn't the mystic black coating be similarly beneficial. I suppose the main concern, besides cost, is whether the coating is uniformly applied.
 

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temperature

the "mystic black" coating you are talking about for bolt carriers (which is deposited by carbon vapor) is rated on their website to 1100 degrees....check out this tidbit about the flame temperature of smokeless powder : Much has been made about ball powders being cooler burning than extruded powders, but the fact of the matter is that there really isn't much difference. Flame temperature is very close to the same for all smokeless powders and runs about 3300 degrees F. Ball type powders tend to be from 3200 to 3300 degrees F and extruded powders tend to run 3300 to 3400 degrees F but there is wide variations ..... seems like the mystic coating wouldn't withstand the internal temperatures
 

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Discussion Starter #5
the "mystic black" coating you are talking about for bolt carriers (which is deposited by carbon vapor) is rated on their website to 1100 degrees....check out this tidbit about the flame temperature of smokeless powder : Much has been made about ball powders being cooler burning than extruded powders, but the fact of the matter is that there really isn't much difference. Flame temperature is very close to the same for all smokeless powders and runs about 3300 degrees F. Ball type powders tend to be from 3200 to 3300 degrees F and extruded powders tend to run 3300 to 3400 degrees F but there is wide variations ..... seems like the mystic coating wouldn't withstand the internal temperatures
Not that I thought I could actually improve my ARP barrel, but at least that puts this question to rest.

I think the type of deposition is similar, but the carbon layer is clearly different and created by a process (gunfire) that allows it to remain through repeated, high temperature detonations.

That's a huge difference in heat.
 

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On his website, H mentions a carbon coating that forms on the inside of a barrel as part of the break-in process.

How is this different from the coating applied by Cryptic Coatings? I am specifically referring to the CVD process used to coat the Mystic Black BCGs.

http://www.crypticcoatings.com/coated-bolt-carrier-group/
Sorry, I have no idea what that may do. The carbon from shooting will still add a layer to that one.
Carbon from shooting fills the small voids and imperfections in the barrel and provides a protective coating between the steel and the copper keeping copper from building up and hurting accuracy...IMO
 

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After barrel break in I was very surprised how little copper fouling I get when cleaning the 16" ARP. With non barnes bullets it's very minimal.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
After barrel break in I was very surprised how little copper fouling I get when cleaning the 16" ARP. With non barnes bullets it's very minimal.
Good to know. I've certainly noticed a difference on another barrel I've got, but I always assumed it was an anomaly.
 
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