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Well,the price is right. Wonder about the glass quality due to the price point. A Vortex 1x6 is $1,399 ea.
 

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Check out ,all4shooters.com They have a write up on the Weaver european scopes. Evedently there is a line Weaver made up for the european market. You would need to learn or know the metric system. We have MOA, Mil and now cm.:a43:
 

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It has nothing to do with the metric system. It just has a German number 4 reticle with the three very thick lines. My Zeiss Conquest has the same reticle. It is good for fast target acquisition on moving game. A lot of European countries (and African) use drives (Battues) where the shooter is in position and the guides beat the brush and drive the game towards them. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/battue
 

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The European line from Weaver was introduced in 2014 specifically for the European demand for scopes, hence the reason for the metric adjustment as indicated.


Sent from a final firing position, the crosshairs are on you!
 

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I do not know if the quality of this "Weaver European rifle scope" is the same or not but the adjustments are quoted on the natchez website as being in cm
Ya, I missed that sorry. So basically 1cm = roughly 1/3" so 3 cm = 1" at 100 yards (actually 1.18") instead of 4 clicks for 1" at 100 yards.
 

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1 cm = about 0.39 inches which is very close to 1/10 Mil which is 0.36 inches.
 

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The 5x25-56 mil dot model has 0.5cm adjustments. If the glass is the same as the super slam euro......... more research is needed.
 

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Check out ,all4shooters.com They have a write up on the Weaver european scopes. Evedently there is a line Weaver made up for the european market. You would need to learn or know the metric system. We have MOA, Mil and now cm.:a43:
Darban,

Most Europeans use radians that is a military standard all over the world and while it is associated with the metric system it actually works with any unit of measure.
One radian is a huge angle so we use thousands of a radiant called miliradiant or simply a mil. One miliradiant (or mil) at 1000 yards equates to 1 yard on the target and one miliradian at 1000 meters is 1 meter. The advantage
of the metric system is that is a factor of 10 os it is easier for shooting and for everything else in the world for that matter. Like one miliradian of 100 meters is 100/1000 that is 0.1 meters that is 10cm. Many scopes will give
you 10 clicks so is one cm per click. That is roughly 0.4 inches. if we did 100 yards that would be 100/1000 = 0.1 yards that 3.6 inches and then we are dealing with 1/4 or 1/8 divisions. So this is why metric is faster.

The thing with the systems is that they are all good if your math is right and if there are any calibrated reticles the ideal is to have your adjustments to match the reticle/ stadia design.
But at the same time if you have enough references in your scope to holdover for the average ranges, and one doesn't need turret for constant adjustments like long range shooters do,
then it is not critical if you have a turret in other unit of measure. One might never use it other than zeroing and simply hold your shots when shooting.
However if you use the reticle a lot and in any magnification then a first focal plane is a great thing so the holdover is always accurate but also one can hold on the target and forget about
the scope. Well after you miss the first time and can at least trace your shot! :a36:
 

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I have several weaver tactical scopes and they are japanese glass and one piece tubes of very high quality and first focal plane like the nice vortex viper pst.
They also track very well and hold zero and never had any problems. If these are also japanese glass and they are constructed
anything like the tactical series they should be well built although I have no experience with that model specifically.
 

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This Weaver ..?

The measurment system built into this Weaver is a "who cares" for me. You click it up ... it goes up. You click it down ... it goes down. You sight it in the same way you would do most any scope.

What would/should be of some concern to ya'll is the eye relief. It is L O N G. Should be a great scope for the heavy recoiling guns used in Africa. Seems it would be great on a 45-70 or my 500S&W carbine or my 10ga. carbine.

Should be good to go as long as you can live with the eye relief. On certain guns .... I could. --- pruhdlr
 

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Darban,

Most Europeans use radians that is a military standard all over the world and while it is associated with the metric system it actually works with any unit of measure.
One radian is a huge angle so we use thousands of a radiant called miliradiant or simply a mil. One miliradiant (or mil) at 1000 yards equates to 1 yard on the target and one miliradian at 1000 meters is 1 meter. The advantage
of the metric system is that is a factor of 10 os it is easier for shooting and for everything else in the world for that matter. Like one miliradian of 100 meters is 100/1000 that is 0.1 meters that is 10cm. Many scopes will give
you 10 clicks so is one cm per click. That is roughly 0.4 inches. if we did 100 yards that would be 100/1000 = 0.1 yards that 3.6 inches and then we are dealing with 1/4 or 1/8 divisions. So this is why metric is faster.

The thing with the systems is that they are all good if your math is right and if there are any calibrated reticles the ideal is to have your adjustments to match the reticle/ stadia design.
But at the same time if you have enough references in your scope to holdover for the average ranges, and one doesn't need turret for constant adjustments like long range shooters do,
then it is not critical if you have a turret in other unit of measure. One might never use it other than zeroing and simply hold your shots when shooting.
However if you use the reticle a lot and in any magnification then a first focal plane is a great thing so the holdover is always accurate but also one can hold on the target and forget about
the scope. Well after you miss the first time and can at least trace your shot! :a36:
Very good description and informative.
 

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eye relief

The measurment system built into this Weaver is a "who cares" for me. You click it up ... it goes up. You click it down ... it goes down. You sight it in the same way you would do most any scope.

What would/should be of some concern to ya'll is the eye relief. It is L O N G. Should be a great scope for the heavy recoiling guns used in Africa. Seems it would be great on a 45-70 or my 500S&W carbine or my 10ga. carbine.

Should be good to go as long as you can live with the eye relief. On certain guns .... I could. --- pruhdlr
I had one scope with long eye relief and was lucky enough to sell it, to someone whom thought it was fine. I do not need another.
 
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