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I stocked up on the S&B 110 grain FMJ ammo from Palmetto when it was $0.60/round shipped. Midway wanted that much just for Hornady brass at the time. The S&B stuff shoots pretty well... about 1.5 MOA, so plenty accurate enough for hunting. I also have some 110 grain Nosler Accubond bullets. My plan is to pull some of the FMJs and seat ABs in their place. I figure with the bullets being the same weight, they ought to shoot real close to the same... hopefully a little more accurately even, with the better bullets.

Anybody else done this with the 6.8?
 

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I would recommend against it. They may be the same weight bullet but the 110 AB is much longer than the 110 FMJ and has more bearing surface and you are likely to be in a significant over pressure situation. Pull one of the FMJs and you will see how short they are. There is barely enough shank to fit in the case neck. I think you might even have issues with the 100 AB. You are better off fire-forming the brass to your chamber anyway. Have fun shooting the FMJs up.
 

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As noted above pressures will probably be an issue. Of course you also have to dump the powder and resize the case. That's a lot of work for possibly no gain. Unless you pour the powder out and average it and THEN do a work-up you are stuck with XXX accuracy and no way of knowing if it is the best you can get.

As a side problem. What if it shoots bug holes by just swapping bullets? I bet the next box you do will never duplicate that. Shooting your best is all about controlling your gear and consistency. The factories are close but not near the level we as handloaders can achieve..

Not worth the effort IMHO. I'm of the shoot 'em and reload not pull, reload and shoot.

Greg
 

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I know this probably goes with out saying, just go have some fun and shoot up the FMJ's then reload up what you want.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I would recommend against it. They may be the same weight bullet but the 110 AB is much longer than the 110 FMJ and has more bearing surface and you are likely to be in a significant over pressure situation. Pull one of the FMJs and you will see how short they are. There is barely enough shank to fit in the case neck. I think you might even have issues with the 100 AB. You are better off fire-forming the brass to your chamber anyway. Have fun shooting the FMJs up.
this is the first time I've ever heard anybody recommend fire forming (and presumably neck sizing) for an autoloader. I bought a small base full length resizing die for reliable cycling. Are very many people using neck sizing in 6.8s?!

As noted above pressures will probably be an issue. Of course you also have to dump the powder and resize the case. That's a lot of work for possibly no gain. Unless you pour the powder out an average it and THEN do a work-up you are stuck with XXX accuracy and no way of knowing if it is the best you can get.

As a side problem. What if it shoots bug holes by just swapping bullets? I bet the next box you do will never duplicate that. Shooting your best is all about controlling your gear and consistency. The factories are close but not near the level we as handloaders can achieve..

Not worth the effort IMHO. I'm of the shoot 'em and reload not pull, reload and shoot.

Greg
I was planning on not dumping the powder and not resizing the case -- just pulling the FMJs and seating the ABs.

I guess I will reassess this if bullet length really is that much different.
 

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I bought a small base full length resizing die for reliable cycling.
henschman, standard dies provide reliable cycling. Unless you have a tight chamber, which is unlikely, you are overworking the brass for no benefit. The only unreliable cycling I have every had in six 6.8 builds came from bulging necks attributed to using the integrated crimp feature in the seating die. If you decide to crimp use the dedicated Lee Collet Die.

Factory ammo/brass is sized for minimum SAAMI which typically has the shoulder set-back around 0.015" more than needed for most chambers. When you resize, you need to set your dies up to only move the shoulder back 0.003" to 0.004". Unless you are running min pressure loads, autoloaders need full-length resize.

Every component makes a difference. You cannot assume that substituting one for another of like weight etc. is safe. Learn from the mistakes of others instead of making your own. I once pulled a bullet from a Federal 90 Gold Dot just to see the bullet and the powder used. When I went to reseat the bullet (flat-base), it deformed the neck so bad the case had to be thrown away. No big deal. I just poured the powder from the Fed brass into a resized Hornady and seated the 90 GD to the same depth as factory. Big surprised when I pulled the trigger. The same set-up except for Hornady brass resulted in an increase of 250 fps and a blown primer. I was lucky. I think your situation swapping a 110 AB for a 110 FMJ would have been more significant.
 

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The proper way to do this would be pull several and weigh the powder charge. Average it out. Then pull a bunch. Start load development 10% lower than the charge weight you found. Find a load that works with the bullet you want to use.
 

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Mexican Roulette Ammo

I think a better title for this thread would be "Mexican Roulette" ammo. The only powder i have ever pulled from factory loaded rounds was just to satisfy my own curiosity to see if i could identify it and absolutely had no intentions of trying switch and swap components and create a Frankenround with it.
I am not saying it can't be done safely under a controlled safe setting I just don't think your personal safety first or second damage to your equipment is even remotely acceptable risk. Most factory powders are non-canister grade powder blends and who is to say other than the chemist and engineers that specified the blend how they will react with different components substituted.

A pound of powder isn't worth an ounce of your flesh if something goes wrong. I will continue to stick to components I can identify, but that's just me being cautious.
 

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IIRC there have been several posts that say the S&B ammo is loaded pretty hot. While this is safe changing any component can be dangerous. If you look at any loading manual it lists specific components that were used to create the loads listed and then it lists a minimum load to start with for when you change components.
 
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