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At first response, I think the SST is a better choice due to its track record of good accuracy in multiple rifle/chamber combos and also the record of solid lethal performance, regardless of accounts of exits, or lack of, meat damage potential, projectile holding together, etc. In anecdotal accounts, it pretty much puts down what was hit very quickly, within reason and assuming adequate shot placement.

That said, in the rare event the Winchester is more accurate for you, good shot placement will almost always supersede terminal performance.
 

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I find the talk of the SST fragmenting and not exiting to be interesting. My son took a large doe at about 150yds, and she never took a step. The exit wound wasn't as big as the 110gr Accubond I used in the past, but it was big enough for my fat thumb to fit in. I chalked that up to the more elastic skin and additional fat higher on the ribcage compared to the heart shot I made with the AB. The deer shot with the AB ran about 50yds, while the larger deer with shot with the SST never went anywhere and died faster. There wasn't much blood on the ground, but when we turned her over, it started pouring out the exit wound. I'm in the "heavier is better" camp, so I figure I'll be using the SST out of my 20" ARP barrel until I see poor performance. Then I'll go back to the 110gr AB.
 

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I find the talk of the SST fragmenting and not exiting to be interesting. My son took a large doe at about 150yds, and she never took a step. The exit wound wasn't as big as the 110gr Accubond I used in the past, but it was big enough for my fat thumb to fit in. I chalked that up to the more elastic skin and additional fat higher on the ribcage compared to the heart shot I made with the AB. The deer shot with the AB ran about 50yds, while the larger deer with shot with the SST never went anywhere and died faster. There wasn't much blood on the ground, but when we turned her over, it started pouring out the exit wound. I'm in the "heavier is better" camp, so I figure I'll be using the SST out of my 20" ARP barrel until I see poor performance. Then I'll go back to the 110gr AB.
It depends on what you consider poor performance . If super accurate and massive wound with or without an exit are considered great performance then you can’t beat the SST . If you consider a bullet that doesn’t always or even usually exit poor performance then you will not like the SST for long . Advantages SST has over Accubond are cheaper - easier to find in bullet only or factory - factory SST faster than factory Accubond ( which are loaded very mild )SSTS seems to be easier to develop super accurate load and factory SST are generally accurate in most barrels . Advantages Accubond have over SST - good bullet integrity ( doesn’t come apart ) - flat hammer head frontal shape when expanded leaves a bigger permanent cavity to leak blood plus keeps bullet on straight path better than round mushroom shape or fragmentation types . My wife will only use SST but I prefer a bullet that always stays together . There is no wrong bullet or opinion here just personal preferences .


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I find the talk of the SST fragmenting and not exiting to be interesting. My son took a large doe at about 150yds, and she never took a step. The exit wound wasn't as big as the 110gr Accubond I used in the past, but it was big enough for my fat thumb to fit in. I chalked that up to the more elastic skin and additional fat higher on the ribcage compared to the heart shot I made with the AB. The deer shot with the AB ran about 50yds, while the larger deer with shot with the SST never went anywhere and died faster. There wasn't much blood on the ground, but when we turned her over, it started pouring out the exit wound. I'm in the "heavier is better" camp, so I figure I'll be using the SST out of my 20" ARP barrel until I see poor performance. Then I'll go back to the 110gr AB.
Ozarkpugs post sums it up perfectly. I don’t think anyone called them poor performers.

Like you, I prefer heavier bullets for hunting bigger game. I also really detest not having exit wounds. You can’t follow a blood trail if there isn’t any blood. That said, just because exit wounds aren’t common with the SST, I would definitely not consider them poor performers. More like, overachievers.

I have a decent sample size, mostly antidotal evidence in the field, but nothing anywhere near as documented and controlled as Xman and Dfleury. Of all bigger game kills I’ve had with SSTs, in several calibers, at best 20% had exit wounds in any caliber. I would characterize all exit wounds as small. All internal wounds were more than substantial. Only a couple of hogs needed follow up shots with the 6.8 SSTs.

I’m not overly impressed with Accubonds but my sample size is one hog in 6.8 and one elk with a 270 Win 140 grn with the ABs. All shots were pass-throughs. I might try them again on the next Texas hog cull.

A good bonded bullet are the 115gr Federal Fusions. I’ve only shot hogs with them but most only went a few yards. I think all were pass-throughs with decent sized exit wounds. Terminal performance is as good as any bonded bullet I’ve used.
 

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Edited: I found XMan's bullet test info here: 6.8 SPC Bullet Performance

FWIW, I found pics of the 120 SST in this 2012 post #46 here: 120gr Hornady SST info
In 2012 at least, the bullet had an interlock ring about halfway up (the tiny barb where the jacket suddenly thickens). It is pretty small and doesn't do a good job. The interlock ring is visible in the jacket fragments of some of Xman's test where it clearly failed to hold the core in. Have they changed the design since then, though?
The photobucket watermark makes it difficult to see the image. It seems to disappear if I click on the image, let it load into another tab, then click on the download symbol.

 

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Edited: I found XMan's bullet test info here: 6.8 SPC Bullet Performance

FWIW, I found pics of the 120 SST in this 2012 post #46 here: 120gr Hornady SST info
In 2012 at least, the bullet had an interlock ring about halfway up (the tiny barb where the jacket suddenly thickens). It is pretty small and doesn't do a good job. The interlock ring is visible in the jacket fragments of some of Xman's test where it clearly failed to hold the core in. Have they changed the design since then, though?
The photobucket watermark makes it difficult to see the image. It seems to disappear if I click on the image, let it load into another tab, then click on the download symbol.


This is a picture of a 6.8 jacket showing what is possibly being called a band . The jacket material in front of the groove fragmented and is gone ( which is typical ) the petals left are the thinner portion between the groove and where the jacket thickness changes abruptly . In my picture you can see the tiny ring at the stepped part of the jacket , this is where expansion stops . It is more of a ledge where the jacket changes thickness than a ring . If there’s any hint of a lock it strips out or flattens with the lead because on bullets that stop expanding sooner it is not visible in the empty jacket. .Look at the picture with the lead core carefully . What seems to be a groove where a lock went is actually a step up in diameter and the portion between the groove and that step is actually larger in diameter than the portion of the bullet under the step up (, kinda like how a 22 lr bullet is as wide as the case ). Now this is just my WAG and I have absolutely nothing else to back this up BUT I think the spare tire / lifesaver portion between the groove and stepped portion of the jacket may be a factor in this bullet being so accurate . Something to do with distribution of weight or something . As I’ve stated earlier , if the designs purpose was to hold the bullet together it was a failure in that role , if it was to make it super accurate they accomplished that goal , if it was designed to inflict serious damage that is also accomplished . Also it does this at a less than premium price and better velocity than expected from a spc load of that weight . Now hopefully someone who is more knowledgeable than I am as to what makes a bullet shoot accurate or insight as to what effect the spare tire / life saver design has on accuracy will chime in . As matter of fact another bullet I refuse to mention is designed with weight removed from the rear and heavier in the middle and it tends to be super accurate and stable . Maybe it’s more than a WAG .


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I've never shot a deer with SST in any caliber, but I have shot hogs with an exit at 22 yards and at 239 yards (both from 12.5" ARP).

My wife shot a 190 lbs Texas whitetail 2 years ago with .243 95gr SST at 20 yards and had a substantial exit.

I think the biggest take away on the SST is they consistently perform inconsistently. But the results are nearly always good, meaning a dead animal won't be far from where it was when it was hit, assuming it was hit forward enough on the abdomen.
 

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A couple of weeks back, my brother in law took his grandson out for a evening hog hunt. He was using a 6.8 AR I put together for him a few years back.

He said one finally showed up just before dusk and presented just right at about 50-55 yards from where they were perched up in a tree.

When the little guy let one rip he said the hog dropped right in its tracks.

I asked him what was the load he used & his reply was “ some of those rounds you gave me.”

To which, said rounds were either 120gn SST factory loads or the 100gn Hornady GMX loads I made for him.

So I’m guessing you can’t go wrong with either one.


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Edited: I found XMan's bullet test info here: 6.8 SPC Bullet Performance

FWIW, I found pics of the 120 SST in this 2012 post #46 here: 120gr Hornady SST info
In 2012 at least, the bullet had an interlock ring about halfway up (the tiny barb where the jacket suddenly thickens). It is pretty small and doesn't do a good job. The interlock ring is visible in the jacket fragments of some of Xman's test where it clearly failed to hold the core in. Have they changed the design since then, though?
The photobucket watermark makes it difficult to see the image. It seems to disappear if I click on the image, let it load into another tab, then click on the download symbol.

These photos you posted show the ring closer to the tip than the pictures you posted earlier, same with the illustration you and ozarkpugs posted showing it near to the back of the bullet.

I did stumble across one SST jacket from a 338 WinMag in my desk earlier today. It doesn’t have a ring but only the back half of the jacket is left. It was likely recovered from either an elk, 220 grn, at 60 yards shot through both femurs or a Whitetail, 200 grn, at 30 yards shot through both shoulders.
 

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These photos you posted show the ring closer to the tip than the pictures you posted earlier, same with the illustration you and ozarkpugs posted showing it near to the back of the bullet.
You are right. The first pic I posed was the generic one on Hornady's for the SST. At that point, I mainly wanted to point out that the interlock ring was really pretty small and easily missed with a cross section. It was more obvious if the core was removed, though. The more recent ones were from actual 6.8 SPC bullets. It took me a while to find those.
For whatever the reason, the interlock ring is too far foreword and does not hold the core for the 6.8 SPC bullet. At SPC speeds, the 120 grain SST is clearly not a a "controlled expansion" bullet, but there is usually a good sized chunk of the core left, so it it is also not completely fragmenting bullet either.
 
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