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Wish I read more into this instead of all the youtube hype. Not sure if I have been drinking all the coolaid, but it some ways it is apparant that the firearms industry loves to develop cartridges that leave something to be desired when in fact the 6.8 has always checked all the boxes in practical applications.


Compared: 6.5 Grendel, 6.8 SPC, .300 Blackout and .350 Legend

By Gary Zinn


Here at Guns and Shooting Online we have made something of a cottage industry of evaluating the performance of the recently introduced .350 Legend cartridge, compared with other relevant cartridges. We started with Chuck Hawks giving an overview of the cartridge itself in The Winchester .350 Legend. Then I (with helpful editorial support from Chuck), compared the .30-30 Winchester and the .350 Legend and the .35 Remington and the .350 Legend. The purpose of these comparisons was to make a thorough on-paper evaluation of how the .350 Legend stacks up in performance against two cartridges long proven to be effective and efficient at taking deer and similar game animals.

Next, we compared the .350 Legend .450 Bushmaster and .50 Beowulf. These three are straight wall case designs, sized to function in AR-15 rifle platforms. In the article noted above, Chuck Hawks explained the background and importance of the characteristics of these cartridges, as follows:

"It is my understanding that Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana have mandated that rifles shooting cartridges of at least .35 caliber with straight wall cases between 1.16 and 1.8 inches in length are now legal for use in what I believe Michigan calls the 'limited firearms deer zone.' (Formerly 'shotguns only,' I believe, for deer hunting.)"

The direct comparison of these three cartridges revealed that they are all capable short to moderate range hunting tools in areas with cartridge size regulations such as these. They can also be useful for hunters who wish to use AR-15 rifles to hunt Class 2 game elsewhere.

This leaves the question of how the .350 Legend cartridge compares with bottle neck AR-15 cartridges that have proven useful for hunting Class 2 animals. This is the subject of this article, to compare the .350 Legend with the 6.5 Grendel, 6.8 Remington SPC and the .300 Blackout.

My choice of the Grendel, SPC, and Blackout for this evaluation is based on the results of an earlier article, Are AR-15 Type Cartridges Good for Hunting Deer?. I found these three cartridges to be the best AR-15 hunting cartridges at the time the article was written. The 7.62x39mm Soviet cartridge was also evaluated, but did not make the cut.

The Comparisons

The characteristics compared include velocity and energy, maximum point blank range and far zero, trajectory, sectional density, killing power and recoil. At the end I will summarize results, muse about rifle platforms and make some concluding remarks. Here are the loads I will evaluate and compare.

.350 Legend loads

Winchester Deer Season 150 grain Extreme Point (EP) - BC .223
Winchester Power Max 160 grain Protected Hollow Point (PHP) - BC .201
Winchester Super-X 180 grain Power Point (PP) - BC .221

6.5 Grendel load

Hornady Custom 123 grain SST - BC .510

6.8 Remington SPC load

Hornady Custom 120 grain SST - BC .400

.300 Blackout load

Winchester Deer Season 150 grain Extreme Point (EP) - BC .392

Velocity and Energy

Velocity flattens trajectory and makes hitting easier as the range increases. It is also the most important factor when computing kinetic energy. Energy is a measure of the "work" a bullet can do, which in this case means powering bullet penetration and expansion. Energy is an important component of killing power, as will be discussed below.

Winchester quotes muzzle velocity (MV) values for its .350 Legend loads from both 16 inch and 20 inch rifle barrels. The 16 inch barrel data are used here, for all cartridges, because 16 inches is the most prevalent barrel length for AR-15 rifles.

Here are the velocity in feet-per-second (fps) and energy in foot-pounds (ft. lbs.) figures for our comparison loads at the muzzle, 100, 200 and 250 yards. The loads are listed in descending order of their MV.

6.8 SPC, Hornady 120 grain SST

  • Muzzle - 2460 fps / 1613 ft. lbs.
  • 100 yards - 2250 fps / 1349 ft. lbs.
  • 200 yards - 2051 fps / 1121 ft. lbs.
  • 250 yards - 1955 fps / 1019 ft. lbs.

6.5 Grendel, Hornady123 grain SST

  • Muzzle - 2420 fps / 1600 ft. lbs.
  • 100 yards - 2256 fps / 1390 ft. lbs.
  • 200 yards - 2099 fps / 1203 ft. lbs.
  • 250 yards - 2022 fps / 1117 ft. lbs.

350 Legend, Winchester 150 grain EP

  • Muzzle - 2225 fps / 1649 ft. lbs.
  • 100 yards - 1877 fps / 1174 ft. lbs.
  • 200 yards - 1569 fps / 820 ft. lbs.
  • 250 yards - 1432 fps / 683 ft. lbs.

.350 Legend, Winchester 160 grain PHP

  • Muzzle - 2125 fps / 1605 ft. lbs.
  • 100 yards - 1752 fps / 1091 ft. lbs.
  • 200 yards - 1433 fps / 730 ft. lbs.
  • 250 yards - 1298 fps / 599 ft. lbs.

.350 Legend, Winchester 180 grain PP

  • Muzzle - 2000 fps / 1599 ft. lbs.
  • 100 yards - 1673 fps / 1119 ft. lbs.
  • 200 yards - 1393 fps / 776 ft. lbs.
  • 250 yards - 1275 fps / 650 ft. lbs.

.300 BLK, Winchester 150 grain EP

  • Muzzle - 1900 fps / 1203 ft. lbs.
  • 100 yards - 1717 fps / 982 ft. lbs.
  • 200 yards - 1549 fps / 799 ft. lbs.
  • 250 yards - 1471 fps / 721 ft. lbs.

Already there are indications that the 6.8 SPC and 6.5 Grendel are decent hunting loads, the .300 BLK perhaps not so much. We need more information before drawing firm conclusions about the .350 Legend loads.

+/- 3 inch Maximum Point Blank Range

I am a firm believer in sighting-in hunting rifles and loads for maximum point blank range (MPBR). I feel that a +/- 3-inch MPBR is appropriate for rifles used to hunt Class 2 game, including the cartridges being evaluated here. My argument is that a prudent and responsible hunter should never attempt a shot at a game animal beyond the MPBR of the cartridge/load being used (and closer is always better).

Here are the MPBR yardages. Results are in descending order of MPBR.

  • 6.5 Grendel, Hornady 123 grain SST: 243
  • 6.8 SPC, Hornady 120 grain SST: 241
  • .350 Legend, Winchester 150 grain EP: 204
  • .350 Legend, Winchester 160 grain PHP: 192
  • .300 BLK, Winchester 150 grain EP: 189
  • .350 Legend, Winchester 180 grain PP: 185

Winchester touts the .350 Legend as "designed for deer hunting out to 250 yards." The MPBR numbers say that this is a substantial over-reach, for all the Legend loads, which have MPBRs between 185 and 204 yards. Among the cartridges compared, only the 6.5 Grendel and 6.8 SPC loads approach being 250 yard cartridges.

Trajectory

Trajectory matters, because the flatter a bullet flies the easier it is to hit a target down range. Bullet placement is the most important factor in achieving quick, humane kills, so anything that makes hitting easier is desirable.

Here are the 100, 200 and 250 yard trajectory figures in inches, for each load, sighted-in for a +/- 3 inch MPBR, computed for a scope mounted 1.5 inches over the bore. Trajectories are rounded to one decimal place; yardage is noted in parentheses. Results are in descending order of MPBR yardage.

  • 6.5 Grendel, Hdy. 123 grain SST: +2.9" (100), +0.5" (200), -3.6" (250)
  • 6.8 SPC, Hdy. 120 grain SST: +2.9" (100), +0.3" (200), -3.9" (250)
  • .350 Legend, Win. 150 grain EP: +3.0" (100), -2.5" (200), -10.3" (250)
  • .350 Legend, Win. 160 grain PHP: +3.0" (100), -4.0" (200), -13.5" (250)
  • .300 BLK, Winchester 150 grain EP: +2.9" (100), -4.4" (200), -13.4" (250)
  • .350 Legend, Win. 180 grain PP: +2.9" (100), -5.2" (200), -15.7" (250)

These data further document what the MPBR data indicate: the 6.5 Grendel and 6.8 SPC are about 240 yard cartridges, while two of the three Legend loads, along with the .300 BLK, fail to reach a useful range of 200 yards.

Note that all five loads, sighted-in for +/- 3 inch MPBR, shoot right at three inches high at 100 yards, which is how these cartridges should be zeroed. This is typical of medium velocity cartridges in general.

Sectional Density

Sectional density (SD) is the ratio of a bullet's weight in pounds to the square of its diameter in inches. SD affects penetration, as all other factors being equal (bullet construction, for example) the bullet with the highest sectional density will penetrate deepest. Obviously, to kill cleanly, any hunting bullet must penetrate into the animal's vitals, so hunting bullet SD is important. For Class 2 game, a SD of .200 has long been considered about the minimum acceptable for medium range rifle cartridges. Here are the SD numbers for our comparison bullets, in descending order.

  • 123 grain (.264"): SD .252 - 6.5 Grendel load
  • 150 grain (.308"): SD .226 - .300 BLK load
  • 120 grain (.277"): SD .223 - 6.8 SPC load
  • 180 grain (.357"): SD .202 - .350 Legend PP load
  • 160 grain (.357"): SD .179 - .350 Legend PHP load
  • 150 grain (.357"): SD .168 - .350 Legend EP load

A longer, smaller diameter projectile penetrates better than a shorter, fatter projectile of the same weight and construction, which only makes sense. The abiding problem with medium and large bore bullets is that they must be quite heavy to have high sectional densities. This is why the .264", .277" and .308" bullets have SDs noticeably higher than the relatively light for caliber .357" bullets.

The 180 grain .350 Legend load just makes the minimum SD .200 rule of thumb, while the lower SDs of the 160 and 150 grain .357" bullets does not bode well for them penetrating deeply on heavy bodied animals. This may not be a great concern on deer and similar sized thin skinned game that do not require a lot of penetration if only broadside lung shots are taken, because these large diameter bullets are going to deliver a lot of shock energy to the target, even if they do not always penetrate well. The killing power analysis, below, sheds more light on this.

Killing Power

Killing power is the most difficult factor to estimate, as there is no definitive scientific formula to apply. Various systems have been created to estimate the killing power of rifle cartridges, with varying results in terms of accuracy. Unfortunately, many such systems have no correlation with reality at all.

One of the best, in terms of positive correlation with reality, has proven to be the G&S Online Rifle Cartridge Killing Power Formula. Not only is it generally consistent with results in the field, it can be used to compare any load at any range and includes the factors of energy at impact (which includes velocity), SD and cross-sectional area in an easy to use formula to arrive at a Killing Power Score (KPS) for a given load at a given distance, via the formula:

KPS at "y" yards (you pick the yardage) = (impact energy at y yards) x (sectional density) x (cross-section area), or simply: KPS @ y = E @ y x SD x A

Cross-section areas of relevant bullet diameters are .0547 sq. in. (.264"), .0603 sq. in. (.277"), .0745 sq. in. (.308"), .1001 sq. in. (.357").

Note that this is a comparative system. We estimate that a rifle cartridge should generate a KPS of at least 12.5 at the range the bullet impacts to be a viable hunting cartridge for common Class 2 game, up to roughly 150 - 175 pounds (e.g., deer and pronghorn), while a KPS of 15.0 gives a margin of killing power for larger Class 2 game (up to 300 pounds).

I calculated the killing power of these loads at 100 yards, as most whitetail deer, blacktail deer and feral hogs are killed at 100 yards, or less. KPS values at the five yard increment closest to each load MPBR are included, to document the power of the loads near the longest range at which a responsible hunter should use them. Loads are listed in descending order of 100 yard KPS values.

  • .350 Legend, Win. 180 grain PP: KPS at 100 yds. = 22.6; KPS at 185 yds = 16.6
  • .350 Legend, Win. 150 grain EP: KPS at 100 yds. = 19.7; KPS at 205 yds. = 13.5
  • .350 Legend, Win. 160 grain PHP: KPS at 100 yds. = 19.5; KPS at 190 yds = 13.6
  • 6.5 Grendel, Hdy. 123 grain SST: KPS at 100 yds. = 19.2; KPS at 245 yds = 15.5
  • 6.8 SPC, Hdy. 120 grain SST: KPS at 100 yds. = 18.1; KPS at 240 yds. = 14.0
  • .300 BLK, Win. 150 grain EP: KPS at 100 yds. = 16.5; KPS at 190 yds = 13.7

If I had to choose one of these loads as an all purpose tool for hunting common Class 2 game, it would be the 6.5 Grendel, which combines adequate power, the longest range in the group and good bullet sectional density. If I wanted the most powerful cartridge of the lot, I would choose the 180 grain .350 Legend load, although it has the shortest MPBR. I believe this load will prove to be the most effective of the initial Legend hunting loads, mainly because it has the highest bullet sectional density.

The remaining four loads have the common limitation of not carrying general Class 2 game power (KPS 15 or greater) all the way to their MPBR distances, though all are powerful enough (KPS greater than 12.5) for medium size, thin skinned game, such as deer. The 6.8 SPC is the best of these loads, with performance so close to that of the 6.5 Grendel that if a hunter has either one, then he/she does not need the other. The main difference is that the Grendel carries more killing power to MPBR distance than does the SPC.

The loads that impress me least are the 150 and 160 grain .350 Legend loads, mainly because of the low sectional densities of the light for caliber bullets. In addition, the .300 BLK load has the limitations of being the least powerful load overall and having the next to shortest MPBR.

Our KPS parameters and results assume vital area hits, of course. A game animal hit somewhere other than in the vitals is not likely to go down cleanly, no matter the size, weight and impact energy of the bullet. This is why I preach the "never take a shot beyond MPBR, and closer is always better" doctrine. Shorter range shots improve the likelihood of placing a bullet in the right place.

Recoil

Evaluating recoil of the .350 Legend is shaky right now, because there is no body of reloading data that can be consulted to get load powder charges, a necessary variable in recoil calculations. Winchester has published some vague promotional material with numbers that suggest that the .350 Legend generates about 12 percent lower recoil than a .30-30. The loads being compared are not clearly specified, which is why I say the information is vague.

I came up with a tentative recoil estimate that may or may not be accurate for the .350 Legend, 180 grain load, but it is the best I can do right now without verified powder charge data for the new cartridge. My guesstimate is that this load will generate about 9.0 ft. lbs. of recoil in an eight pound rifle. I would expect recoil of the 150 and 160 grain loads to be slightly less, because of the lighter weight bullets.

By comparison, my best estimates of recoil in the other calibers and loads are 7.9 ft. lbs. for the 6.5 Grendel, 7.5 ft. lbs. for the 6.8 SPC and 7.0 ft. lbs. for the .300 BLK (all in 8 pound rifles). The bottom line is all of these hunting cartridges and loads are easy on the shoulder, so that recoil is not a significant deciding factor among them.

Additional Thoughts and Conclusions

All in all, the .350 Legend holds its own against the comparison cartridges. Therefore, it has potential as an effective hunting cartridge, especially when fed 180 grain bullets that have adequate sectional density for deer and hog hunting. The Legend looks like a prayer answered for those who hunt in areas where rifles are restricted to short, straight-walled cartridges.

This leads to the issue of rifle platforms for the cartridge. Winchester has announced that the Winchester XPR bolt action rifle will be chambered in .350 Legend. CMMG has announced an AR15 carbine (with a 16 inch barrel) in the cartridge, plus 5 and 10 round magazines. Winchester notes, "several other firearm manufacturers are gearing up" to produce rifles chambered in .350 Legend.

Producing bolt action rifles in .350 Legend should be a snap. Any short-action platform that handles the .223 Remington can be easily reworked to handle the .350 Legend cartridge. Ditto for AR15 platforms, whether complete rifles or uppers.

For old school deer hunters (like me) the lever action is perhaps the best all-around platform for a hunting cartridge. I say this even though I have carried compact, short-action bolt rifles on the majority of my deer hunts. Lever action rifles, such as the Winchester Model 94, Marlin Model 336 and Henry Lever Action .30-30, carry and mount well and cycle fast when more than a single shot is needed.

A well designed bolt rifle also carries and mounts satisfactorily, but cycles slower than a lever gun. Meanwhile, my limited experience with AR15s in the field is that they are unwieldy to carry and awkward to mount, but that may be just me.

Unfortunately, the traditional lever rifle designs, with rear-locking bolts, cannot handle the .350 Legend cartridge, for the simple but critical reason that its MAP is 55,000 psi, well above what rear-locking lever designs can handle. This high-intensity MAP is no problem with bolt action and AR designs, but a lever rifle chambered in .350 Legend must have a front-locking bolt, such as the Browning BLR and Henry Long Ranger designs.

The .350 Legend may prosper as a medium bore deer hunting cartridge, not only in restricted cartridge areas, but in general. AR15 fanciers, long saddled with marginal deer cartridges, are likely to jump all over the cartridge.
 

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What barrel length do the manufacturers list for the cartridges? For a fair comparison that should be equal.

Just looking at 6.8 Hornady SST ammo the test barrel is 16"
Rectangle Font Handwriting Magenta Circle


The 6.5G Hornady SST is a 24" test barrel
Rectangle Font Parallel Circle Logo


This changes the equation a bit.
 

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The choice of bullets and barrel lengths can swing the argument around.... If the CB 120 mkz had been used with a 16" barrel instead of the Hornady 120, the results would be a bit different. Also, the 6.8 has more upside for reloaders as the bolt can take more. All in all, it was not a bad article. It's a complicated situation.
 

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I like the detail put into many of the relevant variables when comparing cartridges. As Strawdawg indicated, it is complicated and complex as it is rarely a true "apples to apples" comparison.

One thing I would like to add to this discussion specifically about sectional density is this; with modern expanding (and even fragmenting) type of projectiles, this changes the way we must evaluate and utilize SD as a data point for penetration capability. Sectional Density is true and relevant in a non-expanding type of projectile that generally follow a straight path (arrows with fixed blades, etc), but the moment a projectile strikes a target and begins to expand, yaw, fragment or all of the above, the original SD of the projectile in it's intact state almost all but goes out the window.

This was a lesson that I heard learned here. And the more I have though about it, the more true it is, in my opinion. And as dynamic as expansion/yaw/fragmenting can be based on so many variables such as what the target density & composition is, the impact velocity & energy, the angle of attack of the projectile, etc., etc., I can't honestly give sectional density very much validity when comparing cartridges/calibers until I that theory is proven wrong, and not just "field observations".

Thanks for sharing.
 

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He lost me when he stated the 7.62x39 wasnt suitable and the 300BS was a better choice.

In an article he linked in this one about AR Deer Cartridges he also stated the big bores wouldnt offer reliable penetration. Dont tell that to the american bison.

"However, these are short to moderate range cartridges and loads. The MPBRs (+/- 3") are 200 yards (Bushmaster), 180 yards (SOCOM), and 165 yards (Beowulf). Bullet SDs are poor, barely over .200 for the SOCOM load and under .200 for the others; do not expect reliable, deep bullet penetration on large animals."
 

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Letherneck and strawdawg just about covered the problems I saw with this write up . I would add that he evaluated several bullets for one caliber and only one for others . Now if you restrict yourself to point blank range of 3" as max range then the other factors were just a waste of time and he could have saved a lot of typing by just saying anything that doesn't give 3" pbr is not good enough . Also found it interesting that he chose to evaluate cartridges that are most often used in ARs yet he doesn't like ARs.

Sent from my LM-K920 using Tapatalk
 

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What barrel length do the manufacturers list for the cartridges? For a fair comparison that should be equal.

Just looking at 6.8 Hornady SST ammo the test barrel is 16"
View attachment 73621

The 6.5G Hornady SST is a 24" test barrel
View attachment 73622

This changes the equation a bit.
Exactly. He castrates the 350 to 16" barrel yet never mentions the barrel length of the others. I spent 45 minutes trying to verify where he gets his numbers from (they change with each article). The only consistent number is the 6.8 Hornady MV from all the articles he's referencing. He only says a 16" barrel is used for the 350L because he doesn't think anyone would use anything different for hunting.

I have no problem comparing a Hornady SST to a Hornady SST as long as your test rifle barrel lengths are the same. Especially when he says he's limiting them to that length!

BC and SD are subjective numbers. Are you getting the BC from the higher velocity of the longer barrel? SD are a ridiculous numbers for expanding bullets. The SST is a fragmenting bullet. What is his sectional density at .5" penetration versus 5" penetration?

Personally I have little interest in hunting with the 350 Legend. I'm a big lever action fan. I've shot and hunted with a 30-30 a lot more than most but have less interest in hunting with it again. How would his 30-30 numbers would compare out of a 16" barrel? The 300BO would start to look like a long range cartridge.
 
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Gunrag either cherry picking or not comparing apples to apples is nothing new. At least this one threw in some actual data, though (as pointed out above) it's lazy generic published data and not comparable/apples to apples by adjusting it all to be as close as possible in bullet weight and barrel length as possible at a bare minimum.
 

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Even though the article attempted to paint the 350 legend as near useless, for anyone interested in the cartridge, Midway has a complete upper on clearance for less than $350 with free shipping. At that price, I'm almost interested.
 

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The US military seems to disagree on the conclusions of "killing power" of 6.5mm vs. 6.8mm, which seems to be nothing more than an academic debate based on incomplete theories that don't actually approximate real world results.

While the differences aren't massive on soft targets, 6.8mm provides greater energy transfer when comparing the same projectile designs and seems to have enough additional drag to expand or fragment at slightly lower velocities on average. For example, MKZ's 6.8mm will expand down to 1400 FPS, while their 6.5mm needs at least 1500 FPS. At hunting ranges, 6.8mm will actually out perform 6.5mm with the MKZ bullets despite the higher BC of 6.5mm due to the combination of faster MV with lower expansion velocity threshold, the BC advantage alone is not enough to give 6.5mm an edge.

The trick of cartridge design for an application is to balance aero dynamic performance with trade off's that typically require the opposite design elements, terminal performance (higher drag), to drive that expansion and tear things up. Higher BC bullets tend to slip through the target just as well as they slip through the air. Gases follow very similar flow attributes around objects as liquids, mammals are nearly 70% liquid....you need enough energy, then you have to preserve it at range, then you have to transfer as much of it as possible. Any one element out of balance = inadequate performance.

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6.5mm out performs 5.56mm, but 6.8mm out performs both. Same performance occurs with barriers, weather steel car door or auto glass. This is as apples to apples as you can get, seems to me that the conclusion of "killing power" based on the simple math is wholly inadequate and does not equate to actual function.
 

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The US military seems to disagree on the conclusions of "killing power" of 6.5mm vs. 6.8mm, which seems to be nothing more than an academic debate based on incomplete theories that don't actually approximate real world results.

While the differences aren't massive on soft targets, 6.8mm provides greater energy transfer when comparing the same projectile designs and seems to have enough additional drag to expand or fragment at slightly lower velocities on average. For example, MKZ's 6.8mm will expand down to 1400 FPS, while their 6.5mm needs at least 1500 FPS. At hunting ranges, 6.8mm will actually out perform 6.5mm with the MKZ bullets despite the higher BC of 6.5mm due to the combination of faster MV with lower expansion velocity threshold, the BC advantage alone is not enough to give 6.5mm an edge.

The trick of cartridge design for an application is to balance aero dynamic performance with trade off's that typically require the opposite design elements, terminal performance (higher drag), to drive that expansion and tear things up. Higher BC bullets tend to slip through the target just as well as they slip through the air. Gases follow very similar flow attributes around objects as liquids, mammals are nearly 70% liquid....you need enough energy, then you have to preserve it at range, then you have to transfer as much of it as possible. Any one element out of balance = inadequate performance.

View attachment 73781

6.5mm out performs 5.56mm, but 6.8mm out performs both. Same performance occurs with barriers, weather steel car door or auto glass. This is as apples to apples as you can get, seems to me that the conclusion of "killing power" based on the simple math is wholly inadequate and does not equate to actual function.
The article in the Original Post is comparing the 6.5 Grendel, 6.8 SPC, .300 Blackout and .350 Legend as hunting rounds. Can you copy and paste a graph with the same cartridges and projectiles used in the article, please?
 

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Interesting article, but like you guys I have to wonder what length barrel was used for the 6.5G. I have yet to read one that is 16" vs 16" or 18" vs 18" between the 6.8 SPC and the 6.5 G. I am one of those who was almost sold on the 6.5 G, but fortunately I noticed the that little difference in barrel lengths. Then I found this forum. I now have 4 - 6.8 SPCs, but no 6.5s. How many people have taken deer or other game at 300 + yds with the 6.8 already? Sp, we know it has the kill factor down.
 

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The article in the Original Post is comparing the 6.5 Grendel, 6.8 SPC, .300 Blackout and .350 Legend as hunting rounds. Can you copy and paste a graph with the same cartridges and projectiles used in the article, please?
My reference was to the data between 6.8 SPC and 6.5 Grendel. I made no mention of .350 Legend nor .300 BO. My data between 6.8 and 6.5 is still valid. I fail to see the issue.
 

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My reference was to the data between 6.8 SPC and 6.5 Grendel. I made no mention of .350 Legend nor .300 BO. My data between 6.8 and 6.5 is still valid. I fail to see the issue.
Right.
 
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