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It will work but you definitely will have to limit range and best to use premium bullets like nosler partition or cavity back bullets . All of our youth season hunting was with . 223 before we found the 6.8 . We never had a problem because we only allowed right behind the front leg shots and 100 yds or under . We used 60 nosler pt and 65 sierra .

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I have found better success with the 77gr Sierra MK on hogs. They are probably among the most accurate 5.56 projectile and at 2750 fps from a 16-18" barrel the Black Hills stuff (or your handoads) has very good range.

The SD makes sure they penetrate well and the 15 bucks a box cost is hard to beat.
 

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My wife killed a 9 point buck and a yearling with her .223 using Winchester PowerPoint 64 grain ammunition. It performed well on the yearling breaking both shoulders and exiting at a range of 55 yards. The deer only traveled about 25-30 yards before it expired. The 9 point buck was shot at a range of 30 yards. The bullet entered behind the right leg and angled through the chest coming to stop in the left shoulder. So no exit and small .22 caliber entrance wound meant hardly any blood to trail. Fortunately, we found the buck just past the last point that my wife saw him before he disappeared. He had traveled about 75 yards from where he was hit. Upon field dressing, the lungs were in bad shape and the entire chest cavity was full of blood and blood clots. So the round did it's job. However, that's when I got her a 6.8 to replace her .223 for deer hunting. If the shot wouldn't have been perfect or if the range would have been longer or both, the deer may have traveled further and with no blood trail to follow, might have been unrecoverable. There literally is almost no margin for error if you don't get an exit wound and a blood trail to follow. Haven't had any issues with the 6.8 not exiting or lack of blood trail with it. As was said, keep ranges short and shot placement precise.
 

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This question gets asked a lot, in my opinion the 223 rem is marginally adequate on deer and hogs weighing less than 100 pounds. Over 100 pounds, there are many options that are better. The 6.8 SPC is near ideal for all deer and hogs.

Like others have said, with the 223 Remington there is very little margin for error. You and your rifle need to be able to shoot groups smaller than 1" at 100 yards and keep your shots to less than 100 yards. Use premium ammunition.
 

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This question gets asked a lot, in my opinion the 223 rem is marginally adequate on deer and hogs weighing less than 100 pounds. Over 100 pounds, there are many options that are better. The 6.8 SPC is near ideal for all deer and hogs.

Like others have said, with the 223 Remington there is very little margin for error. You and your rifle need to be able to shoot groups smaller than 1" at 100 yards and keep your shots to less than 100 yards. Use premium ammunition.
CNS kill zone is way bigger than 1" on even a smaller hog for DRT. Especially with a broadside. I know you didn't say it is 1" but I just want to put it out there piggy is not as bulletproof as your post implies.

I've killed plenty of hogs with 223 past 100 yards. I am moving to 6.8 for shots on moving hogs. As was stated earlier, I do not get exit holes when the bullets go in the neck area which probably is not great for deer hunting.

The Lone Star Boars guy who I am pretty sure posts here has a great video on kill zone for them.


That said, I don't shoot deer with .223 and wouldn't suggest doing so.
 

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None of the hogs got away with softpoints in .233. federal fusion was my favorite for price accracy. i shot mine with thermal at big groups. some needed a followup cause it gets a little western. they were all about 50-70 lbs. most one ran was abot 60-70 yds all taken with 100 yds. looking forward to using 6.8 this incase of hogzilla.
 

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There is a lot of good wisdom in the posts above. Is it doable, certainly but as stated the margin of error is much smaller. The 6.8 gives a wider margin for error and better terminal performance across the board in my experience.
 

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I have found better success with the 77gr Sierra MK on hogs. They are probably among the most accurate 5.56 projectile and at 2750 fps from a 16-18" barrel the Black Hills stuff (or your handoads) has very good range.

The SD makes sure they penetrate well and the 15 bucks a box cost is hard to beat.
I use a the 77 SMK from IMI in my back up back up (buddy gun) pig gun. A friend made it work well on pigs.
 

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CNS kill zone is way bigger than 1" on even a smaller hog for DRT. Especially with a broadside. I know you didn't say it is 1" but I just want to put it out there piggy is not as bulletproof as your post implies.

I've killed plenty of hogs with 223 past 100 yards. I am moving to 6.8 for shots on moving hogs. As was stated earlier, I do not get exit holes when the bullets go in the neck area which probably is not great for deer hunting.

The Lone Star Boars guy who I am pretty sure posts here has a great video on kill zone for them.

That said, I don't shoot deer with .223 and wouldn't suggest doing so.
If you're going to call out my opinion you really need to counter with a viable alternative. I know you didn't say it, but hogs aren't the tissue paper your post implies. I guess broadside of the barn should be good enough? If you can't hold your shots to much over 1MOA you've got no business taking CNS shots. For less experienced hunters I'd recommend heart lung shots.


In my experience (YMMV), the 223 has accounted for more wounded game than any other caliber.

If a cartridge legal to hunt the game you are after, go for it.
 

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If you're going to call out my opinion you really need to counter with a viable alternative. I know you didn't say it, but hogs aren't the tissue paper your post implies. I guess broadside of the barn should be good enough? If you can't hold your shots to much over 1MOA you've got no business taking CNS shots. For less experienced hunters I'd recommend heart lung shots.


In my experience (YMMV), the 223 has accounted for more wounded game than any other caliber.

If a cartridge legal to hunt the game you are after, go for it.
Agree 100% on first answer . As far as 223 wounding more deer that may be what you have experienced and I'm sure it is or you would not have claimed it to be. My experience has been the opposite . As I stated in an earlier post , we used to start the kids out with . 223 s . over a Dozen Kids as young as 7 had no problems mastering them and we always had them shoot tight behind the shoulder .We never had a deer run over 100 yards and we almost always had a pass through . It has been our experience that kids shooting too large of caliber often wound deer and grown ups often take too far or marginal shots with big guns where as those that use . 223 take more time and hit where they aim . I do think the people who take head/ upper neck shots with . 223 s do wound a lot of deer but that can be said of any caliber . Now that we have several 6.8s that is what the kids use . They don't notice the slight difference in recoil and the " reasonable distance " is doubled. Still only tight behind the shoulder for young hunters

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Agree 100% on first answer . As far as 223 wounding more deer that may be what you have experienced and I'm sure it is or you would not have claimed it to be. My experience has been the opposite . As I stated in an earlier post , we used to start the kids out with . 223 s . over a Dozen Kids as young as 7 had no problems mastering them and we always had them shoot tight behind the shoulder .We never had a deer run over 100 yards and we almost always had a pass through . It has been our experience that kids shooting too large of caliber often wound deer and grown ups often take too far or marginal shots with big guns where as those that use . 223 take more time and hit where they aim . I do think the people who take head/ upper neck shots with . 223 s do wound a lot of deer but that can be said of any caliber . Now that we have several 6.8s that is what the kids use . They don't notice the slight difference in recoil and the " reasonable distance " is doubled. Still only tight behind the shoulder for young hunters

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I completely agree with you. I think the way you, Kccactus and other here have started youngsters and new hunters on easy to handle rifles is great and the proper way to go. I have, and will continue to do the same.

Despite my poor experiences with a 223, I never said don't use it. However, with the rather open ended first and only post from the OP (you never know where the person is coming from) i thought it prudent to recommend, know what you're shooting at and if you aim small, you'll miss small.
 
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If one can handle the increase in recoil, then there are better options out there. The only reason I see for it to be used is if its all you have or can get, and need a light recoiling gun for a kid etc. The 6.8, 7.62x39, etc are better choices in my opinion.

Edit: After reading thru the thread i see several who had their wife or kids using 223 and have since switched them to a 6.8 etc. that seems to point to it being doable but not the best tool for the job. I would definitly use a 62gr or heavier round and a bonded or monolithic bullet. CBB MKZ would be my first choice followed by Federal fusion or a TSX as FMJ is a disaster waiting to happen.
 

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Havn't used 223/556 to take any game, but id be confident in the speer 75gr gold dots(I also have a small stock of the 62 fusions, and 64gr gold dots, which both should be ok). I had my daughter hunt with a 223 savage for a year. I upgraded her to a 243 the next year. My other daughter when she came of age, I had her use my ruger 6.8, which she didnt like very much, thats when I let her use my arp 6.8 build. Now she has a 6.5 creedmoor.

Before I knew about the 6.8, I liked the 7.62x39. I took deer with it, but the 6.8 is a very versatile round, and soon replaced the 7.62x39 as my favorite round.
 

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If you're going to call out my opinion you really need to counter with a viable alternative. I know you didn't say it, but hogs aren't the tissue paper your post implies. I guess broadside of the barn should be good enough? If you can't hold your shots to much over 1MOA you've got no business taking CNS shots. For less experienced hunters I'd recommend heart lung shots.
What is this based on tho? For pigs the neck shot is so close to the ear and heart/lung shot the discussion is pointless. Going for heart shots on pigs is harder than the general neck shot.

Deer is a different matter.
 

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For hogs, I try for central nervous system hits at the base of the neck. It is a larger target than the base of the skull and better for longer ranges. If I also get the shoulder blade it turns that bone into fragments into the lungs which increases the lethality of a 224-cal bullet. I've found this POI to be very effective on hogs.
 
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What is this based on tho? For pigs the neck shot is so close to the ear and heart/lung shot the discussion is pointless. Going for heart shots on pigs is harder than the general neck shot.

Deer is a different matter.
Huh? A heart lung shot is pointless?? I don't think you have a grasp on animal anatomy. An ear is not a lethal target. If you actually mean the brain, the brain of a hog is only a little bigger than lemon. Hardly your "...way bigger than 1" on even a smaller hog."

As Xman points out, the other end of the neck presents a bigger and better target and a near miss may damage the lungs. But then again, "...heart/lung shot the discussion is pointless.", except of course the lungs and heart are lethal and pierced ear is not.
 

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Huh? A heart lung shot is pointless?? I don't think you have a grasp on animal anatomy. An ear is not a lethal target. If you actually mean the brain, the brain of a hog is only a little bigger than lemon. Hardly your "...way bigger than 1" on even a smaller hog."

As Xman points out, the other end of the neck presents a bigger and better target and a near miss may damage the lungs. But then again, "...heart/lung shot the discussion is pointless.", except of course the lungs and heart are lethal and pierced ear is not.
Oh you misunderstood. I didn't say a heart/lung shot is pointless. I am saying if you aim as Texas Boar Hunters suggests and you miss deep you hit heart if you miss toward head you hit ear.

I do disagree with you on the point about ear shot is not lethal.

Here is a pig I shot in heart. It was DRT. It walked behind a palmetto and I misjudged how far it walked. The point I have been trying to make is you can aim CNS and miss to heart. On a deer that isn't the case.

Terrestrial animal Groundcover Rodent Wombat wombat
 
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